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Thread: Thinking about buying a sweet 16 need help

  1. #16
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    took the plundge

    Well I took the plunge and purchased the boat. Thank you all for your help and knowledge. After hearing her run I couldn't keep myself contained. Dropped if off at my mechanic last night for a tune up and a once over and hopefully Ill have it in the water by the weekend. probably give it a quick cleaning as well but all in all I am very excited, lets hope all go's well. The boat is going to be run on the south shore of Long Island. So if there is anyone on the south shore? And by the way its a 74 not a 77-78.

    will post pics soon
    Steve thank you for the offer anyway

    Alex

  2. #17
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    Congrats and Welcome (again)!

    You should also consider coming up to Lake George over Father's Day weekend for the 19th Annual Donzi Spring Dust-off.

  3. #18
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    Enjoy your new toy...Ed

  4. #19
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    Good Luck

    the 350 volvo should be a reliable setup just make sure your fuel system is up to date for the ethanol crap we get in NY
    When the sky is grey,look out to sea.
    When the waves are high and the light is dying,
    well raise a glass and think of me...
    When I'm home again,
    boys, I'll be buying!

    My Ride

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  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattyboy View Post
    Good Luck

    the 350 volvo should be a reliable setup just make sure your fuel system is up to date for the ethanol crap we get in NY
    Your telling me brought the boat home last night, ran it for a few minutes before throwing it in the water. Stopped for gas on the way, which must have turned up the sediment siting in the tank from the winter, and the boat ran like ****. Was bringing it to the mechanic anyway for a check up so I'm having him drain the tank as well and check the carbs. Waste of $40 bucks

  6. #21
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    if the fuel lines are original they will not hold up to ethanol , have you mechanic look at them .
    When the sky is grey,look out to sea.
    When the waves are high and the light is dying,
    well raise a glass and think of me...
    When I'm home again,
    boys, I'll be buying!

    My Ride

    Come Join Us on The Queen Of American Lakes



    Contact Us

    www.lgdonziclassic.com

  7. #22
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    Let the sibling rivalry begin.Definitely want to get a fuel line with the ethanol proof liner
    machinist ,bore it deeper,ream it bigger, and lap it to a fine finish



    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...=2&theater

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by joseph m. hahnl View Post
    Let the sibling rivalry begin.Definitely want to get a fuel line with the ethanol proof liner
    How difficult is it to replace the fuel line? From what ive been reading replacing the gas tank requires the deck to be removed. How do they run lines to the tank if there is no access?

  9. #24
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    the vent line should be accessible up by the fill hose. The supply line should be accessible with the floor locker out and some longer skinny arms or there may be an access hole in the floor by the sender . you'll want to put in a fuel filter/ separator . and just know that everyone with a 40 yr old boat has to dance with the 800lb gorilla that is a foamed in metallic tank
    When the sky is grey,look out to sea.
    When the waves are high and the light is dying,
    well raise a glass and think of me...
    When I'm home again,
    boys, I'll be buying!

    My Ride

    Come Join Us on The Queen Of American Lakes



    Contact Us

    www.lgdonziclassic.com

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by aseredin87 View Post
    How difficult is it to replace the fuel line? From what ive been reading replacing the gas tank requires the deck to be removed. How do they run lines to the tank if there is no access?
    Usually they leave the pick up tube and sender accessible through the floor locker like Matty said. I left my old one in place and just ran a new one on the inner side of the stringer. It's really not that long of a run and not that difficult. you may have to replace the fittings if you choose not to use crimped fittings on the hose. Just make sure you use the right J spec marine fuel line, as they do come in a few flavors
    machinist ,bore it deeper,ream it bigger, and lap it to a fine finish



    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...=2&theater

  11. #26
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    and even if the tank was replaced...
    Have the top off the 18 now because of a tank replacement that's replacing a tank that was replaced before and then enclosed in open cell foam.
    A winner is just a loser that got up and did it one more time.
    1959 Biesemeyer - 4pt Hydro Drag - 2013 ACBS Winner - Best Race Boat
    1967 Nova Marine - SuperNova24 - ACBS Winner - 2012 Best Race Boat - 2016 Peoples Choice & Best Non Wood
    1972 John Allmand - Nova 19
    1982 PolarKraft -Jonboat - Crab Killer

  12. #27
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    Don't freak just yet. Ethanol fuel settles into layers, with water on the bottom, where the pickup is.

    Alcohol also is more of a solvent that gas, which tends to loosen up crap on the tank sides/bottom. It also will dissolve the fuel line (if it is the original). All the loosed up crap will plug filters, and water obviously doesn't burn, if it happens to make it as far as the carb.

    There should be at least one inline filter, and depending on the carb (2 bbl vs 4 bbl) there is usually a smaller, secondary filter inside the carb behind where the fuel line attaches to the carb.

    Also no telling what condition the carb is in. You did say it ran for a little before filling the tank and launching.

    Unless you can tell the fuel line looks like it has been replaced, or you can still read the markings on the line to see what certification/rating it has, you really should replace it. Thank you politicians for the really bad idea of adding alcohol to our gas.

    Climb up under the bow a little on the storage tray, and see if it smells like gas. If it smells strongly of gas, you most likely have an issue with the tank. That wouldn't be the end of the world, but it can feel like it. I never intended to pull the deck when I first bought my 16, but ended up doing it, which allowed me to fix a lot of things, and verify the fuel tank (which had been replaced) was still solid.
    “Oh right, because you walked into strippers discount warehouse and said ‘Help me showcase my intellect.’” - Archer

    Bill
    Grand Rapids, Michigan
    1985 Donzi Criterion SS
    1967 Donzi 16 Ski Sporter, C16-409, Has a new home!
    38' Carver Aft Cabin
    1968 Sea Ray SRV 180 w/1975 70 hp Evinrude
    10" RIB w/15 hp 1984 Evinrude

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Say N20 View Post
    Don't freak just yet. Ethanol fuel settles into layers, with water on the bottom, where the pickup is.

    Alcohol also is more of a solvent that gas, which tends to loosen up crap on the tank sides/bottom. It also will dissolve the fuel line (if it is the original). All the loosed up crap will plug filters, and water obviously doesn't burn, if it happens to make it as far as the carb.

    There should be at least one inline filter, and depending on the carb (2 bbl vs 4 bbl) there is usually a smaller, secondary filter inside the carb behind where the fuel line attaches to the carb.

    Also no telling what condition the carb is in. You did say it ran for a little before filling the tank and launching.

    Unless you can tell the fuel line looks like it has been replaced, or you can still read the markings on the line to see what certification/rating it has, you really should replace it. Thank you politicians for the really bad idea of adding alcohol to our gas.

    Climb up under the bow a little on the storage tray, and see if it smells like gas. If it smells strongly of gas, you most likely have an issue with the tank. That wouldn't be the end of the world, but it can feel like it. I never intended to pull the deck when I first bought my 16, but ended up doing it, which allowed me to fix a lot of things, and verify the fuel tank (which had been replaced) was still solid.
    ok im going to look into this. Before I made the purchase, I made sure the boat was running. Ran it for a good 10 min, on whatever gas was in the tank at the time and it ran fine. brought it home ran it again just to be sure I didnt get stuck at the dock, filled it up and the problem began, spoke to the marina today. The mechanic didnt get a chance to look at it but hes pretty sure its the old gas in the tank. Im thinking that the carb is clogged up as well, just with my experiences with my other boats and lawn equipment. Ill have to make sure I add stabilizer next time, but in the mean time ill take the opportunity to wax it all up

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Say N20 View Post
    Don't freak just yet. Ethanol fuel settles into layers, with water on the bottom, where the pickup is.

    Alcohol also is more of a solvent that gas, which tends to loosen up crap on the tank sides/bottom. It also will dissolve the fuel line (if it is the original). All the loosed up crap will plug filters, and water obviously doesn't burn, if it happens to make it as far as the carb.

    There should be at least one inline filter, and depending on the carb (2 bbl vs 4 bbl) there is usually a smaller, secondary filter inside the carb behind where the fuel line attaches to the carb.

    Also no telling what condition the carb is in. You did say it ran for a little before filling the tank and launching.

    Unless you can tell the fuel line looks like it has been replaced, or you can still read the markings on the line to see what certification/rating it has, you really should replace it. Thank you politicians for the really bad idea of adding alcohol to our gas.

    Climb up under the bow a little on the storage tray, and see if it smells like gas. If it smells strongly of gas, you most likely have an issue with the tank. That wouldn't be the end of the world, but it can feel like it. I never intended to pull the deck when I first bought my 16, but ended up doing it, which allowed me to fix a lot of things, and verify the fuel tank (which had been replaced) was still solid.
    ok im going to look into this. Before I made the purchase, I made sure the boat was running. Ran it for a good 10 min, on whatever gas was in the tank at the time and it ran fine. brought it home ran it again just to be sure I didnt get stuck at the dock, filled it up and the problem began, spoke to the marina today. The mechanic didnt get a chance to look at it but hes pretty sure its the old gas in the tank. Im thinking that the carb is clogged up as well, just with my experiences with my other boats and lawn equipment. Ill have to make sure I add stabilizer next time, but in the mean time ill take the opportunity to wax it all up

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Say N20 View Post
    Don't freak just yet. Ethanol fuel settles into layers, with water on the bottom, where the pickup is.

    Alcohol also is more of a solvent that gas, which tends to loosen up crap on the tank sides/bottom. It also will dissolve the fuel line (if it is the original). All the loosed up crap will plug filters, and water obviously doesn't burn, if it happens to make it as far as the carb.

    There should be at least one inline filter, and depending on the carb (2 bbl vs 4 bbl) there is usually a smaller, secondary filter inside the carb behind where the fuel line attaches to the carb.

    Also no telling what condition the carb is in. You did say it ran for a little before filling the tank and launching.

    Unless you can tell the fuel line looks like it has been replaced, or you can still read the markings on the line to see what certification/rating it has, you really should replace it. Thank you politicians for the really bad idea of adding alcohol to our gas.

    Climb up under the bow a little on the storage tray, and see if it smells like gas. If it smells strongly of gas, you most likely have an issue with the tank. That wouldn't be the end of the world, but it can feel like it. I never intended to pull the deck when I first bought my 16, but ended up doing it, which allowed me to fix a lot of things, and verify the fuel tank (which had been replaced) was still solid.
    I know it. All that varnish from over the years comes off and fouls the fuel. Filters only get the big stuff, and if you go to a fine micron filter it plugs instantly. A string filter, like for water purification would be cool if the made it for gasoline.
    machinist ,bore it deeper,ream it bigger, and lap it to a fine finish



    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...=2&theater

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