Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 42

Thread: Trailer aluminum vs steel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    110
    Rep Power
    0

    Trailer aluminum vs steel

    in the market for a new trailer for my classic 18 Should I go with aluninum with large I beams or a steel like Continental or Eagle. The aluminum certainly looks beefier. Any input is appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    468
    Rep Power
    17
    Check out LoadMaster in Port Clinton Ohio. I just had two trailers custom made for my Donzis. They are C-channel steel with multi coat polyurethane custom paint...built like tanks. Very pleased with the quality and the customer service is extremely good.

    Rob

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    14,574
    Rep Power
    32
    I have switched from steel to aluminum, the difference in towing is startling. You really know when you have steel behind you, aluminum tows super sweetly almost like no boat in tow. There is no way I could ever consider steel again!
    No matter what your beliefs are "GOD BLESS AMERICA"

    Semi retired marine tech over 50 years in the biz.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,202
    Rep Power
    16
    The aluminum will basically last as long as you have the boat. It's certainly not uncommon to hear about someone replacing the axles, suspension, and everything else around an aluminum trailer frame.

    The only benefit you get out of steel is it flexes less... On a small boat, doesn't matter, but on bigger boats it can make a difference to some.

    The steel will rust, just a matter of time, and will require maintenance. While I wouldn't shy away from a boat that was sitting on a steel trailer... if buying a new trailer the hands down winner is aluminum

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,173
    Rep Power
    14
    IF steel, I would not consider anything but galvanized. I believe the Loadmaster folks have a tank large enough to dip the entire welded frame (I gather some others don't).
    "I don't have time to get into it, but he went through a lot." -Pulp Fiction

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    3,908
    Rep Power
    21
    Ralph, do a search here on this one. I think this has been debated almost as much as motor oil.

    I have had a lot of steel trailers. They do get knicked up and rust.

    I started pulling welded aluminum trailers about seven years ago. I have run MYCO and Manning. They are lighter and they hold up better. I would do another welded aluminum in a heart beat.

    The key difference between a welded and a bolt together aluminum is the fit to the boat from my observation. Since the welded is built around the boat, you can have your bunks and frame set-up completely around the hull. My boat sits lower in the trailer so the center of gravity is lower, so it pulls better. The bolt togethers don't fit as nice, the boat sits higher, and they rattle like crazy, because they are an adapted frame, with an erector set of bolt-on parts.

    Either way you go, welded or bolt-together, if you are going to buy a new trailer, and plan to keep it, buy aluminum.
    People have a preception that welded aluminum trailers are expensive, but I fould Manning to be quite reasonable, and they are here in Michigan. The trailer they built for my Formula 280 was an absolute tank. Give them a call.

    BTW, where were you this weekend with the Magnum at Brownies? We looked for you. Nice show.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    12,657
    Rep Power
    27
    I've had both aluminum and galvanized steel.......................

    For the life of me, I can't think of a single reason why anyone would buy a steel trailer, except maybe they never had an aluminum trailer.
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,202
    Rep Power
    16
    Welded can crack. Even from a quality manufacturer that specializes in welded (manning / myco) there are plenty of complaints of relatively new trailers cracking and having major issues. The problem is you get a new welder or just a good welder having a bad day and everything can go to hell.

    Bolted does flex more and they do tend to make some funny noises when flexing over hills etc. A bit of noise and flex I'll take all day Vs. an all out failure that can come at an unexpected time. A cracked weld can really screw up your day, especially after it cracks and you have to find someone that knows how to weld aluminum in who knows where.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    10,168
    Rep Power
    27
    many have had great luck with custom built steel trailers from http://www.pcbtrailers.com/ they last a long time they tow great and launching and capturing is a snap . I did see a high end rolls single axle welded alum trailer (was a nice trailer) but it floated making capturing the boat a bit of a challenge and it also developed cracks around the welds.
    When the sky is grey,look out to sea.
    When the waves are high and the light is dying,
    well raise a glass and think of me...
    When I'm home again,
    boys, I'll be buying!

    My Ride

    Come Join Us on The Queen Of American Lakes



    Contact Us

    www.lgdonziclassic.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    185
    Rep Power
    0
    I've owned probably 15 steel trailers and put thouands of miles on them, when we were racing coast to coast for 15 years with no problems. They look better than alum. as they can be cutom painted to match your boat. Performance trailers in Lake George did 2 of my Donzi trailers and they tow great. However if your near the salt don't even look at steel go aluminum...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    3,908
    Rep Power
    21
    Yep, welded aluminum done wrong can crack. The seams must be banded with a supporting piece of metal to box them in and finish the job. Done wrong, the seam can break. Both MYCO and Manning do the banded form of welding.

    Interesting thing, you almost always see the big salty offshores that get launched in the drink, not lifted off, on welded aluminum trailers, not erector set trailers.

    As for apperance, my aluminum trailer looks great under my Donzi. I've attached a picture of the Manning under the Formula for reference, too. I would have never put that boat on a erector-set trailer, and it didn't cost any more than one, so it was an easy choice.

    To each their own, but I wouldn't have anything else.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,417
    Rep Power
    14
    they are easier to see in the water when you are coming up to load the boat as well


    cause they float
    Please keep in mind I don't know anything......
    any information I have is made up.....
    and generally I am part of the problem
    VICE President-Weller's Bay DONZI Association

    OFFICIAL LAKE GEORGE POKER RUN CHAMPION

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    12,657
    Rep Power
    27
    If ya put brakes on all the axles like you're supposed to, they won't float.
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    12,657
    Rep Power
    27
    One other thing I noticed, if ya tied down the transom and the bow, they don't flex either.
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    87
    Rep Power
    0
    Hey Trip,

    Don't I remember that your Myco trailer suffered a fracture that had to be repaired/re-welded?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •