Page 10 of 20 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 295

Thread: 1989 Team Warlock 28' World Class Offshore

  1. #136
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    Thanks so much Ken. I will check the gauge to see the increments, but the oil temp was running with the needle almost directly in the middle at speed and around 180 when I slowed down to idle. I am almost certain that the oil temp is not what caused my engine problem like Fix indicated so I will not be increasing the size of the cooler when I do the work. Thanks again, Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  2. #137
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,851
    Rep Power
    16
    Mike, I am talking the SAE test for grading the oil. It has nothing to do with bearings or types of material.


    Ken



    Oil Viscosity - How It's Measured and Reported


    Noria Corporation
    Tags: viscosity, oil analysis According to the Society of Tribol-ogists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE), viscosity is one of an oilís most important physical properties. It is often one of the first parameters measured by most oil analysis labs because of its importance to oil condition and lubrication. But what do we really mean when we talk about an oilís viscosity?
    A lubricating oilís viscosity is typically measured and defined in two ways, either based on its kinematic viscosity or its absolute (dynamic) viscosity. While the descriptions may seem similar, there are important distinctions between the two.
    An oilís kinematic viscosity is defined as its resistance to flow and shear due to gravity. Imagine filling a beaker with turbine oil and another with a thick gear oil. Which one will flow faster from the beaker if it is tipped on its side? The turbine oil will flow faster because the relative flow rates are governed by the oilís kinematic viscosity.
    Now letís consider absolute viscosity. To measure absolute viscosity, insert a metal rod into the same two beakers. Use the rod to stir the oil, and then measure the force required to stir each oil at the same rate. The force required to stir the gear oil will be greater than the force required to stir the turbine oil. Based on this observation, it might be tempting to say that the gear oil requires more force to stir because it has a higher viscosity than the turbine oil. However, it is the oilís resistance to flow and shear due to internal friction that is being measured in this example, so it is more correct to say that the gear oil has a higher absolute viscosity than the turbine oil because more force is required to stir the gear oil.
    For Newtonian fluids, absolute and kinematic viscosity are related by the oilís specific gravity. However, for other oils, such as those containing polymeric viscosity index (VI) improvers, or heavily contaminated or degraded fluids, this relationship does not hold true, and can lead to errors if we are not aware of the differences between absolute and kinematic viscosity. For a more detailed discussion on absolute versus kinematic viscosity, refer to the article ďUnderstanding Absolute and Kinematic ViscosityĒ by Drew Troyer, published in the 2002 March-April issue of Practicing Oil Analysis magazine.
    Figure 1. Capillary Tube Viscometer
    Capillary Tube Viscometer Test Method
    The most common method of determining kinematic viscosity in the lab utilizes the capillary tube viscometer (Figure 1). In this method, the oil sample is placed into a glass capillary U-tube and the sample is drawn through the tube using suction until it reaches the start position indicated on the tubeís side. The suction is then released, allowing the sample to flow back through the tube under gravity. The narrow capillary section of the tube controls the oilís flow rate; more viscous grades of oil take longer to flow than thinner grades of oil. This procedure is described in ASTM D445 and ISO 3104.
    Because the flow-rate is governed by resistance of the oil flowing under gravity through the capillary tube, this test actually measures an oilís kinematic viscosity. The viscosity is typically reported in centistokes (cSt), equivalent to mm2/s in SI units, and is calculated from the time it takes oil to flow from the starting point to the stopping point using a calibration constant supplied for each tube.
    In most commercial oil analysis labs, the capillary tube viscometer method described in ASTM D445 (ISO 3104) is modified and automated using a number of commercially available automatic viscometers. When used correctly, these viscometers are capable of reproducing a similar level of accuracy produced by the capillary tube manual viscometer method.
    Stating an oilís viscosity is meaningless unless the temperature at which the viscosity was measured is defined. Typically, the viscosity is reported at one of two temperatures, either 40įC (100įF) or 100įC (212įF). For most industrial oils, it is common to measure kinematic viscosity at 40įC because this is the basis for the ISO viscosity grading system (ISO 3448). Likewise, most engine oils are typically measured at 100įC because the SAE engine oil classification system (SAE J300) is referenced to the kinematic viscosity at 100įC (Table 1). Additionally, 100įC reduces the rise of measurement interference for engine oil soot contamination.
    Figure 2. Rotary Viscometer
    Rotary Viscometer Test Method
    A less common method of determining an oilís viscosity utilizes a rotary viscometer. In this test method, the oil is placed in a glass tube, housed in an insulated block at a fixed temperature (Figure 2). A metal spindle is then rotated in the oil at a fixed rpm, and the torque required to rotate the spindle is measured. Based on the internal resistance to rotation provided by the shear stress of the oil, the oilís absolute viscosity can be determined. Absolute viscosity is reported in centipoise (cP), equivalent to mPa∑s in SI units. This method is commonly referred to as the Brookfield method and is described in ASTM D2983.
    While less common than kinematic viscosity, absolute viscosity and the Brookfield viscometer are used in formulating engine oils. For example, the ďWĒ designation, which is used to denote oils that are suitable for use at colder temperatures, is based in part on the Brookfield viscosity at various temperatures (Table 2).
    Based on SAE J300, a multigrade engine oil that is designated as SAE 15W-40 must therefore conform to the kinematic viscosity limits at elevated temperatures according to Table 1 and the minimum requirements for cold cranking as shown in Table

  3. #138
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    A friend helped me pull the IMCO outdrive this afternoon in about 15 minutes (his back did the real work). He offered to help me pull the engine that he said should only take us about an hour tomorrow. Chad does not mess around - . He is helping Derebery build a moly cage in the race Skater they plan to test this year, but he has a little time to help me along with other work he has going. He told me that if we get the engine to Derebery right now, they can work on it right away - . Onwards, Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  4. #139
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,489
    Rep Power
    0
    It sounds like you have your attack plan well in hand
    1972 16 OB - C16B-63 - "Surface Tension" Resto Project
    1974 16 OB - DMR16106017-B - "The Mule"

  5. #140
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    490
    Rep Power
    9

    Cool Out of the Water!

    Hehehehe, just seeing that picture of the boat flying through the air reminded me of how I blew the previous engine in my 22C .... new 482 stroker has a rev limiter so that it doesn't over rev when it gets airborne. I can't believe that no one else has ever had this problem.
    Oledawg
    Raconteur, bon vivant, curmudgeon
    Other duties as assigned


    Lake Tillery, NC
    - Heart of the Uwharrie Mountains

    '88 Donzi Classic 22 "Bad Nuff" - 482 stroker 454, Bravo One, Solas 4 blade, Red/White hull, White Deck ( "drivin" boat )

    '87 Correct Craft Riviera "Oledawg" - 454 PCM ( "cruzin" boat )


    "A man without a boat is a prisoner" - Faronese proverb

  6. #141
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    I will also be changing the rev limit chip in the MSD box from a 7000RPM to something like 6200 if it is available. Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  7. #142
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    490
    Rep Power
    9

    BBC RPM's

    To me this is an interesting question...what is the top end recco on a BBC? My tech says that the BBC, unlike a SB, is really not made for running wide open for extended periods, no matter how the bottom end is built...just too much metal moving around. He set the rev limiter at 3500 rpm for the 20 hour break in, but then we are thinking no more than 5000 rpm afterward, and then only for relatively short periods. The old motor and prop would push the boat to 72-75 mph...not sure what the new one will do yet, but even with the revs limited the increased HP and 4 blade prop gives a markedly better hole shot.

    So, what do folks with a 454 normally run their engines at WOT? And for how long? Just curious....
    Oledawg
    Raconteur, bon vivant, curmudgeon
    Other duties as assigned


    Lake Tillery, NC
    - Heart of the Uwharrie Mountains

    '88 Donzi Classic 22 "Bad Nuff" - 482 stroker 454, Bravo One, Solas 4 blade, Red/White hull, White Deck ( "drivin" boat )

    '87 Correct Craft Riviera "Oledawg" - 454 PCM ( "cruzin" boat )


    "A man without a boat is a prisoner" - Faronese proverb

  8. #143
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    Leon Derebery's guys disassembled the 548 and found that 2 rod bearings had let go due to having too tight a clearance. He did not think that my running it at 6500RPM made them let go - they were just installed with too little a clearance. They plan to install a new Callies crank with new and better connecting rods, a new roller cam (the old cam's fuel pump eccentric had been damaged) with the solid lift roller lifters that were there along with new 1.7 roller rockers instead of the 1.8s so the new cam will have taller lobes (he told me the reason why he wanted to make the ratio change, but it slipped by me). He did not want to use the Eagle crank or rods (the crank was scored anyway). He will balance everything, install new rings on the good domed pistons that were in it, freshen up the heads, and run it on the dyno before I get it back in a couple weeks. Thankfully, no real damage was done to the rest of the engine since I idled it back after hearing the knock. The windage tray in the oil pan got a little scuffed, but it will be fine. I also took the Lightning headers to my powder coating guy to have them done in silver instead of black. Everything on the engine will now be silver. I got in some 3" oil cooler brackets from Eddies so I can mount the cooler more solidly than the custom made aluminum bracket that was in the underside of the engine attached to the port engine mount. When I get it all back to running again, I will be trying the new 5 blade Cutting Edge 27" prop. Onwards, Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  9. #144
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,489
    Rep Power
    0
    Bill, any progress yet on the fix for the Team Warlock?
    1972 16 OB - C16B-63 - "Surface Tension" Resto Project
    1974 16 OB - DMR16106017-B - "The Mule"

  10. #145
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    Greg,
    I still don't have the engine back from Derebery. It will have the Callies Dragonslayer crank, Carillo rods, and a new Comp Cam with 1.7 ratio roller rockers. All my other parts are good, but it will get new rings, etc. Fortunately, I am not in any hurry since we don't enjoy boating in the hottest part of the summer here in Texas. Part of the reason for the delay is that Leon's wife tragically commited suicide two weeks ago. My wife and I attended the funeral service 9 days ago.
    I look forward to trying the new Cutting Edge prop when I do install it. I ran a new wire for the oil temp sender from the gauge back to the engine compartment, secured the driver's seat with another bolt throught the cockpit side, touched up the bilge paint work, had the headers powder coated silver (they were black), and did a few other changes in the engine compartment. When I do get it all put together, I will now know exactly what I have. I can't wait to run it in rough water this Fall to see how it behaves, but I think it will be great with almost no hull pounding noise from what I have already experienced. We love the boat from the small amount of time spent in it so far. We bought a new house for my wife this week so I am busy doing some projects there before she moves in so it will be a while before the Warlock gets back on the front burner. We live in separate houses, but spend every evening and her non-business days together - I know, we are not the typical married couple - lol - Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  11. #146
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,489
    Rep Power
    0
    Wow that is terrible news. It just goes to show how things can go terribly wrong very quickly. It sounds like you have your path clearly defined for the boat and it will be even better then when you got it. I'm bummed that it required any additional expenditure but that goes with the territory! Good luck with it!
    1972 16 OB - C16B-63 - "Surface Tension" Resto Project
    1974 16 OB - DMR16106017-B - "The Mule"

  12. #147
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    Yep. I was figuring on at least a couple seasons before doing anything major, but now I know where everything stands. By the way, the gimbal bearing was on its way out which might have caused some serious damage. I will still only have about $23,000 in the boat which is a bargain in my book for an unusual 28' 75mph deep v offshore boat that looks almost new and has a fresh 540CID/700HP engine with an IMCO Extreme drive. No complaints here - Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  13. #148
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,489
    Rep Power
    0
    I agree with that. $23k would have been low for that particular set-up. I'm still not sure why they sold it so cheap. Perhaps they did not really know what they had
    1972 16 OB - C16B-63 - "Surface Tension" Resto Project
    1974 16 OB - DMR16106017-B - "The Mule"

  14. #149
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    I had the Lightning headers and intake manifold powder coated silver and should be able to Imron the new oil cooler in the next couple days along with installing the engine after finally getting it back from Derebery. I also installed an oil cooler temp sender which it did not have even though it has the gauge. Pictures will follow when I get it done along with a report on how the boat performs with the new Cutting Edge 5 blade prop. Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

  15. #150
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,819
    Rep Power
    14
    I just got home from installing the engine after making a few improvements in the engine compartment. The new oil cooler is Imroned and I hope to hook up all the peripherals in the next few days. This has dragged on far too long! I have restored boats in less time - lol. I will show some pictures after I have it all rigged. Bill

    1971 Donzi 18' 2+3
    1985 Eliminator 23' Daytona Offshore - Kevlar hull
    1988 23' Donzi CC F-23 with 250HP EFI Mercury OB
    1989 28' Team Warlock Offshore - single 548CID/600HP
    1990 23' Warlock Offshore - single 525HP
    Bill from Denison, TX - Lake Texoma

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •