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Thread: Ply or Coosa?

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by mphatc View Post

    George,

    Thank you . . . 7.2" isn't that bad to blend . . .I'm also considering gussets from the hull to the transom, two on each side.
    These would be perpendicular to the 24 degree surfaces one up each side of the drive mounting surface . . thoughts??
    Mario L.
    Mario, darn computer doesn't have a "DEGREE" symbol, so I used an asterisk instead. That was 7.2 degrees of angle. There's really not that much difference though. If your transom is also 9/16" thick, the scarf will be about 6 3/4".
    That 3/4" bottom opening is 9" wide.
    Bummer!
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  2. #77
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    George,
    Are you talking about the glass joint or the plywood joint?
    Because if it's plywood that's HUGE . . . and I'm not doing that! I might as well rip out the whole transom, the transom is 1 1/2" plywood and 9/16" glass on the outside and 3/16" inside.
    I can understand a scarf joint for glass that wide, that makes sense and that's easy!! In a high stress area like the transom I'd usually go wider anyways.
    But plywood . . . ?
    My plan is to gusset the transom and add inner transom plates. I'm retaining Volvo drives which are normally just through bolted so they don't sandwich the transom like a Mercruiser.
    As my whole purpose of this exercise is to raise my drives 2" like the racers back in the day did . . All they did was raise the drives, and close off the bottom with aluminum plates. I'll rebuild the plywood, add fiberglass from the outside to finish the transom correctly, and install 1/2" thick aluminum transom plates inside. This should function to spread the load over a wider area and avoid the deformation from the bolts and washers.
    Your thoughts are valued . . .
    Mario L.
    68 Magnum 27 with Grizzly props
    69 Corsican

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by mphatc View Post
    George,
    Are you talking about the glass joint or the plywood joint?
    Because if it's plywood that's HUGE . . . and I'm not doing that! I might as well rip out the whole transom, the transom is 1 1/2" plywood and 9/16" glass on the outside and 3/16" inside.
    I can understand a scarf joint for glass that wide, that makes sense and that's easy!! In a high stress area like the transom I'd usually go wider anyways.
    But plywood . . . ?
    My plan is to gusset the transom and add inner transom plates. I'm retaining Volvo drives which are normally just through bolted so they don't sandwich the transom like a Mercruiser.
    As my whole purpose of this exercise is to raise my drives 2" like the racers back in the day did . . All they did was raise the drives, and close off the bottom with aluminum plates. I'll rebuild the plywood, add fiberglass from the outside to finish the transom correctly, and install 1/2" thick aluminum transom plates inside. This should function to spread the load over a wider area and avoid the deformation from the bolts and washers.
    Your thoughts are valued . . .
    Mario L.
    68 Magnum 27 with Grizzly props
    69 Corsican
    So, Mario, you aren't changing the transom cut out? Just moving the drives upward in the existing opening? If I'm missing it, let me know.
    Then your plan seems reasonable. I don't get the 'glass on the outside?????
    I was talking about glass, not plywood.
    If I were adding gussets perpendicular to the bottom, and I'm assuming you're adding it to the transom glass where you cut out the plywwod, the only thing I'd suggest is good drainage, and make sure you don't create hard points in the hull bottom at the forward ends of the gussets.
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  4. #79
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    [quote=scippy;582405]George,
    If I could, I'd like to heat a good portion of the enclosure just to extend the restoration through the winter and be comfortable while doing it, but we'll see........What would be the minimum temperature to realistically do fiberglassing?quote]

    I don't think I'd try it much below 60*.
    Mind you, the hull needs to be that temp also.
    That makes it a lot harder.
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  5. #80
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    Scippy
    One or two cheap electric space heaters can get the area you are glassing to heated up good as long as its not too big at one time then let the heater stay on the glassed part overnight afterwards. Keep the resin and fabric inside and it should work out fine as long as its not 20 outside
    Could give you a little more time to work before deep winter sets in Its going to be in the 60's here this week so you will get that near the end of the week.

    Parnell
    Time forSweet Cheekz to find a new home

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by mphatc View Post
    George,
    Are you talking about the glass joint or the plywood joint?
    Because if it's plywood that's HUGE . . . and I'm not doing that! I might as well rip out the whole transom, the transom is 1 1/2" plywood and 9/16" glass on the outside and 3/16" inside.
    I can understand a scarf joint for glass that wide, that makes sense and that's easy!! In a high stress area like the transom I'd usually go wider anyways.
    But plywood . . . ?
    My plan is to gusset the transom and add inner transom plates. I'm retaining Volvo drives which are normally just through bolted so they don't sandwich the transom like a Mercruiser.
    As my whole purpose of this exercise is to raise my drives 2" like the racers back in the day did . . All they did was raise the drives, and close off the bottom with aluminum plates. I'll rebuild the plywood, add fiberglass from the outside to finish the transom correctly, and install 1/2" thick aluminum transom plates inside. This should function to spread the load over a wider area and avoid the deformation from the bolts and washers.
    Your thoughts are valued . . .
    Mario L.
    68 Magnum 27 with Grizzly props
    69 Corsican

    Hello Mario,

    When Roger M. raised my drives two inches, he glassed/plywooded in the bottom area. and it held up fine.

    Hello Scippy.
    Your work is looking good. Thank you for keeping us posted.

    Thank you
    jim

  7. #82
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    My two CENTS!

    Do not run the plywood down around the drain whether it is a tube or screw plug, 90+% of transom rot starts at the drain plug.

    My glass work was done by one of the finest guys on the east coast, he was at the time head glass man for Hustler. He told me the two most important things to stop water migration was no wood by the lug and to isolate the stringer wood from the transom wood. The transom wood on mine was cut straight across, there is no structual reason to run it down into the vee. The area below the ply in my transom was built to 3/4" solid glass, he said it will never go bad. He did the glass work to with stand way more ponies then I will ever put back there, note the doubled stringers and extra gussets there is even more forward no doubt one of the strongest 22's out there.
    No matter what your beliefs are "GOD BLESS AMERICA"

    Semi retired marine tech over 50 years in the biz.

  8. #83
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    Mphatc , let me get this right you are going to raise the drives 2 inches just glass in an insert with no scarf joint put in aluminum backing plates on the back side and only glass the front like they did in the day and is this correct?

  9. #84
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    My intent is to follow your lead on this Phil. As I did have some water in the wood at the bottom I've chosen to rebuild the lower section of the transom, pictures of how I will do this on the "Time Flies" thread, I feel like I'm hijacking someone else's thread here.

    Offshore Ginger . . . no, I'm replacing the lower 8" of plywood core with a scarf joint 7.5" wide, or tall . . . . all of my rebuilding will be done with epoxy, and the lower crescent of the old cut out will be glassed in from the outside with another scarf joint.

    I'm building this boat to stay in the water, it will not be a trailer queen! To that end the hull drain plug will be an NPT insert . . these never leak when installed correctly.

    Mario L.

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    [quote=MOP;582547]Do not run the plywood down around the drain whether it is a tube or screw plug, 90+% of transom rot starts at the drain plug.

    MOP,
    You wonder why such a vunerable spot wasn't completely isolated from wood when they built the transom's of these boats........no doubt, I won't forget this simple precaution.

    Mario,
    More people around this table of discussion are welcome.........I'm learning as your asking..................no hijack, unless where taking about solar powered boats... LOL!!
    1983 Cigarette 35' Mistress
    1976 Magnum 27' Sport
    1986 Donzi 18' Classic
    NEVER FORGET 9/11

  11. #86
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    Today I picked up the new fuel tanks and the propane convection heater (50,000 to 2000,000 btu's) for the portable structure Now, I'll be able to keep toasty while working on the Magnum right through the winter, if I so choose...............I'll clean and prep the tanks for a zinc chromate primer before I install.............no foam this time around, tanks will be secured w/ side and front brackets. On the bottom's will be 1/4" neopreme squares fior circulation.........just gotta get an order into Merton's before I can start.
    1983 Cigarette 35' Mistress
    1976 Magnum 27' Sport
    1986 Donzi 18' Classic
    NEVER FORGET 9/11

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by scippy View Post
    Today I picked up the new fuel tanks and the propane convection heater (50,000 to 2000,000 btu's) for the portable structure Now, I'll be able to keep toasty while working on the Magnum right through the winter, if I so choose...............I'll clean and prep the tanks for a zinc chromate primer before I install.............no foam this time around, tanks will be secured w/ side and front brackets. On the bottom's will be 1/4" neopreme squares fior circulation.........just gotta get an order into Merton's before I can start.
    Scippy - Pete


    Cool Hut,
    Who made your new tanks and what gauge (thickness) did they use?
    Stainless or Alum?
    Can you use a 1/4" neopreme one pcs sheet rather then squares?
    Like to see some photos with the brackets and when you install the tanks

    Thank you
    Jim

  13. #88
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    Fixx

    Quote Originally Posted by scippy View Post
    Today I picked up the new fuel tanks and the propane convection heater (50,000 to 2000,000 btu's) for the portable structure Now, I'll be able to keep toasty while working on the Magnum right through the winter, if I so choose...............I'll clean and prep the tanks for a zinc chromate primer before I install.............no foam this time around, tanks will be secured w/ side and front brackets. On the bottom's will be 1/4" neopreme squares fior circulation.........just gotta get an order into Merton's before I can start.

    heads up on that heater,,they are not that good,the galvanised metal heats up and along with the propane you will get sick..i have one and it didn't heat my old shop and it was insulated..a tank from a gas grill only last about 4-6 hrs then i freezes up and the btu's go way down almost to a pilot light.. your better off with a kerosene salamander heater or a electric fostoria electric salamander which i have for emergencies and it will keep my shop @ 65*..

  14. #89
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    Not to mention having to ventilate that space that you're trying to keep warm.
    George Carter
    Central Florida
    gcarter763@aol.com
    http://kineticocentralfl.com/


    “If you have to argue your science by using fraud, your science is not valid"
    Professor Ian Plimer, Adilaide and Melbourne Universities

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by dammmagnum View Post
    Scippy - Pete


    Cool Hut,
    Who made your new tanks and what gauge (thickness) did they use?
    Stainless or Alum?
    Can you use a 1/4" neopreme one pcs sheet rather then squares?
    Like to see some photos with the brackets and when you install the tanks

    Thank you
    Jim
    Jim,
    Alloy Metal Works, Farmingdale L.I. I think they came out pretty good.........Marshall (MdonziM) hooked me up with them after he had 2 made for his 27 Mag Starfire.
    1/8" Aluminum 65" Long - approx. 65 gals apiece.........$400 per.
    A flat sheet of 1/4" neopreme would not give me the air circulation around the bottom of the tank as would the varied placement of squares. Jim, the picture above shows the welded brackets on the tanks, I'll take more pics as I go along.
    1983 Cigarette 35' Mistress
    1976 Magnum 27' Sport
    1986 Donzi 18' Classic
    NEVER FORGET 9/11

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