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Conquistador_del_mar
01-17-2017, 03:49 AM
If any of you guys have an interest in arrowheads or other indian artifacts from North America, there is a new book that just got released from publication called Who's Who in Indian Artifacts #11 by Steven Cooper. This 600 page high resolution color book has an outstanding assortment of some of the best collections in the US and is the latest edition since the last edition which came out 16 years ago. I was honored to be invited by Steven Cooper to display 6 pages of some of the best of my collection which has taken me a couple decades to assemble.

45171
01-17-2017, 08:22 AM
I'm happy that you posted this. Did you get your collection by purchasing the artifacts or are you lucky enough to know where to look to find them?

Ghost
01-17-2017, 08:48 AM
Congrats, very nice! (And here's to Bear, at 18!) :)

f_inscreenname
01-17-2017, 02:14 PM
The Bay's shoreline is full of arrowheads.

Conquistador_del_mar
01-17-2017, 03:05 PM
I'm happy that you posted this. Did you get your collection by purchasing the artifacts or are you lucky enough to know where to look to find them?

I had to buy almost all of the better pieces in my collection which can be difficult with all the modern made fakes (artifakes) out there. Even with COAs (certificate of authenticity) from the better authenticators, you have to become an expert at determining both authenticity and originality of each artifact using primarily microscopes. I do find quite a few arrowheads and other artifacts, but most of the larger and better collections are assembled from purchases. I bought roughly 25% of my collection directly from the finders or families of the finders. If you get the book, you will see some of the best artifacts ever found in North America.

Conquistador_del_mar
01-17-2017, 03:07 PM
Congrats, very nice! (And here's to Bear, at 18!) :)

Thanks and I'll tell Bear you wished him well.

Carl C
01-17-2017, 10:02 PM
I have a few items from my flea market days. Could you shed any light on them? The first two stones are round, the third is obviously a cutting or chopping tool and the last looks like maybe a grinding tool. I know nothing about the 20" x 17" piece of fabric. :confused:

Conquistador_del_mar
01-17-2017, 10:41 PM
The first two appear to be river rocks that have been eroded into those shapes - they pros would call them geofacts - lol. The third appears to be a celt which is commonly called a hand axe. The fourth is hard to tell from the picture, but it has the shape of a celt. However, that material does not look like it would have been used to make a celt. If the fourth piece has a rounded top, it is most likely a pestle use for grinding. The cloth piece appears to be a relatively modern made placemat.

SKnies
01-18-2017, 04:47 PM
That celt is very cool! I purchased some placemats just like that in Cancun a while back. This is a really cool grinding stone and pestle I found in Auburn, CA. The Maidu Indians used to inhabit the area. There are tons of grinding holes along the rivers where they used to grind acorns, but I haven't seen many portable ones like this.
8561085611

Lenny
01-19-2017, 02:40 AM
My summer home IS on a midden from 3-400 years ago. Anyone want some REAL cool stuff. It's all over here.

Seriously, and I am serious, we reside there on weekends and the artifacts REALLY make you think...

think back... the sun came up and went down, no different from today, but ...

weird stuff to think about... I like it. It puts me in my place...

I think Stan's great great great great grandparents were here 'cuz I saw a primitive drawing of his 22 hatch here on a rock...

:confused:

Ghost
01-19-2017, 02:48 AM
In early cave drawings it was common to point out rigging mistakes. Best I recall, the Suquamish phrase "Dkhʷ'Suqw'Abshol" translates roughly to "fu'd you jerks do to my hatch?!"

Lenny
01-19-2017, 02:52 AM
Lmfao !!!

:)

Morgan's Cloud
01-19-2017, 02:56 PM
Bill , you obviously have a really cool collection of these historical artifacts , but what is the approximate age spread for your stuff in terms of how old it is ?

Conquistador_del_mar
01-20-2017, 12:20 PM
Bill , you obviously have a really cool collection of these historical artifacts , but what is the approximate age spread for your stuff in terms of how old it is ?

Approximately 13,000 years from the oldest being Clovis points to the bird points that could be only a few hundred years old. There are many sites in the North American continent where the entire range of artifacts can be found.

Carl C
01-20-2017, 06:40 PM
The first two appear to be river rocks that have been eroded into those shapes - they pros would call them geofacts - lol. The third appears to be a celt which is commonly called a hand axe. The fourth is hard to tell from the picture, but it has the shape of a celt. However, that material does not look like it would have been used to make a celt. If the fourth piece has a rounded top, it is most likely a pestle use for grinding. The cloth piece appears to be a relatively modern made placemat.


That celt is very cool! I purchased some placemats just like that in Cancun a while back. This is a really cool grinding stone and pestle I found in Auburn, CA. The Maidu Indians used to inhabit the area. There are tons of grinding holes along the rivers where they used to grind acorns, but I haven't seen many portable ones like this.
8561085611

Thanks guys. Sorry about the delay, been busy. Yes, the last stone is in a perfect pestle shape so that's what it is. The cutting stone I would guess was maybe used for skinning harvested animals. I was hoping that the fabric may have been a true Native American piece but it sounds like it's nothing. This was all part of a batch of stuff I bought to get some other desirable items. I don't know why the round rocks were in there if they are just river stones, which they probably are.