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woobs
08-09-2014, 11:32 PM
Was up at the MLA Port Carling Antique Boat Show today when this decidedly non-antique cruised through the locks (not part of the show). It sounded as good as it looks... I think the beauty was lost on most of the white shoe and cane set in attendance though.

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...but, if you think some of the old boats don't have any "get-up-n-go" this 800HP Viper V10 is nestled in a 35' 1923 Ditchburn. Not too shabby for a boat valued at somewhere north of a quarter million.
80420

Conquistador_del_mar
08-10-2014, 01:16 AM
Cool Tuff! (no, I didn't say that with a lisp - lol)

RBT
08-10-2014, 11:09 AM
The WaCheeWe 32 ditchburn, has a 625 hp illmor. The value is NORTH of a Million, the restoration was 3/4's.

tuff # 2 with the 525. Their is also a tuff 28 with a 725 illmor running around up their.

Conquistador_del_mar
08-10-2014, 12:49 PM
Here is a video of the Wa Chee We restoration. It was intentionally sunk in the 1960s to preserve the wood until it could be restored later but was lost for 40 years.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TQOjeigKCk

woobs
08-10-2014, 04:40 PM
I stand corrected 625HP. (I was told it was 800) Still, a pretty powerful engine for an old style boat.... more than your average Scripps or Kermath.

I don't know who valued it over 1M. The cost may have been 3/4 million but it's not worth near that amount. Probably more wishful thinking out loud from those that spin the tale this is an original Ditchburn. It probably IS the most expensive way to build a boat though.

There is not one original piece of wood in that "Ditchburn". The original deck configuration has been changed and even the deck hardware is not original. Combine this with the modern power plant and you have a really, really nice replica with cool power built on the bones of an irreplaceable classic.

Conquistador_del_mar
08-10-2014, 06:54 PM
There is not one original piece of wood in that "Ditchburn". The original deck configuration has been changed and even the deck hardware is not original. Combine this with the modern power plant and you have a really, really nice replica with cool power built on the bones of an irreplaceable classic.

Exactly what I was thinking. When does a restoration become a replication? It is a very nice looking boat from the videos on youtube.

RBT
08-10-2014, 10:42 PM
I stand corrected 625HP. (I was told it was 800) Still, a pretty powerful engine for an old style boat.... more than your average Scripps or Kermath.

I don't know who valued it over 1M. The cost may have been 3/4 million but it's not worth near that amount. Probably more wishful thinking out loud from those that spin the tale this is an original Ditchburn. It probably IS the most expensive way to build a boat though.

There is not one original piece of wood in that "Ditchburn". The original deck configuration has been changed and even the deck hardware is not original. Combine this with the modern power plant and you have a really, really nice replica with cool power built on the bones of an irreplaceable classic.

there is a lot wrong with your statements.
First it was scuttled, when it was scuttled it did t have the original deck as it had been conveted to a utility boat known As the b'isle. The new deck is what the original was like before it became a worker. The sinking to save the wood is politically correct......
Lastly, it was restored by Gary Clark, of Clark boats. I know the old owner, the new owner and the restorer well. My info is correct. And it does have some original wood in it.
As for its value, go make an offer.......
there are quite a few that a million won't buy.
sea horse and eaglet come to mind.

woobs
08-11-2014, 12:30 AM
Nothing wrong with my statements. Nobody said the original was not scuttled. The current boat is a very nice boat. It is an expensive way to build one. It's not the original driveline. The hardware was replaced. it's not the original configuration (close but, deck/cocpit dimensions are not the same) as it came from Ditchburn. There is no original wood in it. (The original wood referred to is 1 small piece which serves no purpose, except to say it's original attached under a seat out of sight... which is kinda misleading).

Gary Clark is known to many in Muskoka and the wood boat community. He does fine work. I've met both Gary and the new owner too. But, that does not change anything. it's a nice reproduction that takes advantage of a loophole in ACBS policy with the method of replacing pieces while the boat always resembles a boat (a policy meant to facilitate repairs not total remanufacture). I don't think even the ACBS thought anyone would throw that much cash at a project like this, performed in this manner.... but, truth is stranger than fiction.

Technically the ACBS National (and Toronto) says it's original. Some organizations say a boat must retain 33% original material to be considered so. I don't know about that.... But, many, and I am one, believe this particular case be less than an honest claim of originality due to the way it was done as a total remanufacture.

Even worse , the original had to be destroyed to do it. A shame really. But, that doesn't matter because it IS a beautiful boat. It has a great story. The owner has spent a ship load of money and the old guard at the ACBS loves it. They even invented a "Best repowered" award this year just for this boat! Think about that... ACBS "repowered" award... huh?

The story I was told (several times) is that It was scuttled (to store out of sight) so people wouldn't keep asking the old owner if he would sell it as it was just sitting there rotting and people knew it.... nothing to do with preserving it. But, I'll take your version too. I'm sure the story and the legend will grow with time.

As for value... well again it does not matter as even as a reproduction it's way out of my league. I'm sure it's insured for over 1M! ( I would if I spent that much on a boat). Suffice it to say with the originality arguably questionable (ethically not technically) and the size of the very minute potential market, combined with the low likelihood of it offered for sale anytime soon.... Well, I said it was north of $250,000 and it is.... how much? We'll have to wait and see. Personally I think it's a generational heirloom now and we'll never need to find out. I could be wrong.

Bottom line. The owner loves it. The owner enjoys it and the owner can afford it. The rest is all "cocktail talk".

I posted the picture to show a cool engine in an old style boat in contrast to an audience that probably identifies more with the TUFF (and it's cool engines) I pictured. Can't we just enjoy that?