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View Full Version : POLL: Engine Ign Kill Safety Lanyard/Tether Use



silverghost
12-05-2011, 11:15 PM
I thought I would start this Poll & discussion here on your use of Engine Ignition Kill Safety Lanyard/Tether on your Donzi .

Since while driving a Donzi 16' & 18', & other similar boats, you are really in reality sitting ON the boat rather than IN the boat because of the high center of gravity of the passenger seating areas, and low freeboard of the cockpit area~~~~ I just wondered how many Donzi owners actually use an engine safety ignition kill switch lanyard & tether ?

None of the many boats my family has ever owned in 50+ years of boating has ever had such an ignition safety kill lanyard/tether.
I do use an engine ignition kill lanyard while out on the SeaDoo PWC hooked directly to a D-ring on my PWC life jacket vest.

Three years ago Dad & I were out fishing in the Great Egg Harbor Bay just below the Ocean City Yacht Club.
Several teenagers employed by the club were out on the water in small Boston Whaler tenders setting-up red float bouys for the afternoon's sailboat race.
One kid was standing and racing the yacht club tender around the sailboat race route dropping off a bouy & anchor when he decided to make a sharp abrupt turn.
The teenager flew in one direction right off the tender while the boat continued at a rapid speed into the circle turn.
The boat continued to make several high speed circles when it suddenly hit
a boat wake and the outboard motor suddenly shifted to the center steering position and the boat was now heading straight through a group of boats that were drift fishing for flounder.
We were in one of about 12 other boats in that drift fishing fleet group.
The speeding tender zoomed past us by about 4 feet~~~We had no real time to react~~~start the boat~~~and try to get out of the way.
It narrowly missed all the other drifting boats as well but was now heading at a very high speed still driverless down the bay heading toward the Ocean City north point side of the Longport /Ocean City NJ toll bridge.
As it got close to the bridge another boat wake hit the boat and it turned sharply to starboard.
Seconds later it ran up on the beach at high speed, just before hitting the bridge, and scooted about 50 feet up onto the sand.
The outboard motor whipped violently up & back; and the prop was still spinning wildly when the Boston Whaler tender finally came to a sudden halt.
It was almost like seeing a chase scene out of a James Bond movie .
What a near miss~~~~
The results could have been tragic.
The Teenager was fished-out of the water uninjured .

This episode proved to Dad & I the value of having ,& actually using, a safety lanyard/tether engine ignition kill switch.

Do you have a similar story to tell ?

Did a safety lanyard/tether ever save you, or a family member ?

Did you ,or a family member ever fly out of your Donzi without a safety lanyard/tether engine ignition kill switch installed , or hooked-up.

Do you have & actually USE your safety tether/lanyard ?

Any opinions & stories greatly appreciated.

Thank's

maddad
12-06-2011, 08:08 AM
I always hook it on. Oddly, when I take it off to get out of or move around the boat, I clip it on the blower switch, which the can't be pushed in to the off position.

Carl C
12-06-2011, 09:44 AM
Always! It's a no brainer. It causes no discomfort so I clip it on my shorts even when I forgo the life jacket.

Greg Guimond
12-06-2011, 10:09 AM
Clip or die..........:yes:

mc donzi
12-06-2011, 10:37 AM
We have about a 15-20 minute ride in a restricted speed zone(10 kph/6mph) before I can 'give 'er'. As we approach the unrestricted speed zone, we both put on our PFD's. Our PFD's are the inflatable type that you have to pull the ripcord to activate(not automatic inflation when hitting the water). I have drilled a hole in the plastic handle for the ripcord that I insert the clip for the lanyard. My theory is, that if I get ejected, the force will activate the CO2 cartridge to inflate the jacket as well as release the kill switch and stop the boat. Hopefully I won't have to put it to the test.:crossfing:

mattyboy
12-06-2011, 11:31 AM
[ QUOTE=$originalposter]silverghost
POLL: Engine Ign Kill Safety Lanyard/Tether Use
I thought I would start this Poll & discussion here on your use of Engine Ignition Kill Safety Lanyard/Tether on your Donzi .

Since while driving a Donzi 16' & 18', & other similar boats, you are really in reality sitting ON the boat rather than IN the boat because of the high center of gravity of the passenger seating areas, and low freeboard of the cockpit area~~~~ I just wondered how many Donzi owners actually use an engine safety ignition kill switch lanyard & tether ?

None of the many boats my family has ever owned in 50+ years of boating has ever had such an ignition safety kill lanyard/tether.
I do use an engine ignition kill lanyard while out on the SeaDoo PWC hooked directly to a D-ring on my PWC life jacket vest.

Three years ago Dad & I were out fishing in the Great Egg Harbor Bay just below the Ocean City Yacht Club.
Several teenagers employed by the club were out on the water in small Boston Whaler tenders setting-up red float bouys for the afternoon's sailboat race.
One kid was standing and racing the yacht club tender around the sailboat race route dropping off a bouy & anchor when he decided to make a sharp abrupt turn.
The teenager flew in one direction right off the tender while the boat continued at a rapid speed into the circle turn.
The boat continued to make several high speed circles when it suddenly hit
a boat wake and the outboard motor suddenly shifted to the center steering position and the boat was now heading straight through a group of boats that were drift fishing for flounder.
We were in one of about 12 other boats in that drift fishing fleet group.
The speeding tender zoomed past us by about 4 feet~~~We had no real time to react~~~start the boat~~~and try to get out of the way.
It narrowly missed all the other drifting boats as well but was now heading at a very high speed still driverless down the bay heading toward the Ocean City north point side of the Longport /Ocean City NJ toll bridge.
As it got close to the bridge another boat wake hit the boat and it turned sharply to starboard.
Seconds later it ran up on the beach at high speed, just before hitting the bridge, and scooted about 50 feet up onto the sand.
The outboard motor whipped violently up & back; and the prop was still spinning wildly when the Boston Whaler tender finally came to a sudden halt.
It was almost like seeing a chase scene out of a James Bond movie .
What a near miss~~~~
The results could have been tragic.
The Teenager was fished-out of the water uninjured .

This episode proved to Dad & I the value of having ,& actually using, a safety lanyard/tether engine ignition kill switch.

Do you have a similar story to tell ?

Did a safety lanyard/tether ever save you, or a family member ?

Did you ,or a family member ever fly out of your Donzi without a safety lanyard/tether engine ignition kill switch installed , or hooked-up.

Do you have & actually USE your safety tether/lanyard ?

Any opinions & stories greatly appreciated.

Thank's
{$pagetext}[/QUOTE]

SG you have me confused here you go on in great lengths with a story about an accident and what an impacted in made on you to use a laynard but then go ahead an vote for my donzi doesn't have a laynard??????? why not vote for going to install in the future that would say i don't have one but want one????

a story that made me think laynards were a good idea. accident on my lake about 7 years ago maybe more 2 boats 2 people on each boat at night one boat a drift one boat above the night speed limit of 15 mph. boats collide two in the a drift boat killed by impact , two on the speeding boat in the water survived impact only to have their boat circle and run them over. took the rescue crew a while to foul the prop with snare rope traps. a tragedy no matter what but maybe a laynard may have made a difference.

anyone who has an old volvo powered classic with out power steering and with out a laynard try letting the wheel slip between your fingers on plane you'll get a good idea of the death circle ( DO NOT TRY THIS ON MY SUGGESTION IF YOU LET THE WHEEL GO AT SPEED YOU ARE GOING TO GET HURT ) adding a laynard is one of the best improvements you can make to an older boat, I also found it useful in troubleshooting and getting a new motor up and running like turning the motor over with no spark or killing the motor quickly much better than trying to pull the coil wire or reach for the key.

silverghost
12-06-2011, 03:33 PM
Matty~
I voted that way for the very same reason that you stated that you have not seen a reason nor a need to use your bilge blower in the last three years. ;-)

As many here know my "benchseat 18" project Donzi is completely engineless, with no viable Volvo drive, the deck is now off, the fuel tank is rotted-out & shot, and my aft stringers, lower transom, along with some deck balsa core is still rotted.
Half the deck core we replaced before my Dad got very ill & sadly passed-away weeks later and the project was put on-hold~~~until now.

Not much chance of me flying out of this Donzi at any speed without a safety lanyard any time soon in the near future.
I will live dangerously for now~ ;-)

biggiefl
12-06-2011, 03:36 PM
Honestly I never wear mine unless I am alone or going fast. One may have saved my life about 10 years ago though when I hit a piling at night doing about 20 in my Whaler. I remember looking up and I was pressed up against the windshield and for a second I thought the boat was vertical until I looked astern and saw I was just dead in the water. My bud pulled up at that point and he was just behind me so I don't know if I was knocked out for a few seconds. Anyway I totaled the Montauk but it drove home on plane with the front end smushed in almost to the bow locker. Piling was no where to be found. Not only did the tether help but being I was in a Whaler certainly did. Only reason I was wearing it that night was because I was alone.

mattyboy
12-06-2011, 03:52 PM
[ QUOTE=$originalposter]
Matty~
I voted that way for the very same reason that you stated that you have not seen a reason nor a need to use your bilge blower in the last three years. ;-)

As many here know my "benchseat 18" project Donzi is completely engineless, with no viable Volvo drive, the deck is now off, the fuel tank is rotted-out & shot, and my aft stringers, lower transom, along with some deck balsa core is still rotted.
Half the deck core we replaced before my Dad got very ill & sadly passed-away weeks later and the project was put on-hold~~~until now.

Not much chance of me flying out of this Donzi at any speed without a safety lanyard any time soon in the near future.
I will live dangerously for now~ ;-)

{$pagetext}[/QUOTE]

your time might be better spent working on the boat than running these polls :yes: boating season will be here sooner than you think. if you're still a cash buyer for a benchseat mine will be on the market first of the year come with 25k in cash

Jraysray
12-06-2011, 04:48 PM
So its on the the ankle and away we go. I used to clip it to the shorts but I kept killing the boat when moving around.

f_inscreenname
12-06-2011, 05:46 PM
By myself or when going a little nuts. You also sit in my Nova then on top like with a Donzi.

The Hedgehog
12-06-2011, 05:53 PM
I only wear them when I am wasted so I won't get pulled over for BUI.

The only problem is that I am getting a tan line from mine!

roadtrip se
12-06-2011, 06:15 PM
I find it to be a great way to shut off my engine before I leave the cockpit. Sometimes I forget this, because my exhaust is so quiet...

Anybody that doesn't use this sort of very basic safety precaution is a hazard to anyone and everyone around them.

Offset
12-06-2011, 07:06 PM
installing one is my next project.

The Hedgehog
12-07-2011, 12:17 PM
I actually just strap mine around my ankle. I usually do not know it is there. Key in and strap on.

Team Jefe
12-07-2011, 01:30 PM
Every time. that is "every time period":yes:

John C in PA
12-07-2011, 02:29 PM
Yep, every time. I also added a red velcro wrist strap to my lanyard instead of clipping it to my vest as a reminder I'm hooked up.

John C

osur866
12-08-2011, 01:17 AM
[ QUOTE=$originalposter]{$pagetext}[/QUOTE]
Ditto, been using the velcro wrist strap also, find it less restrictive and its right there by the throttle anyway! I don't use when I come off plane and am just idleing back to the docks, I use to and have forgotten its on and stopped the engine a cpl times while docking at the most inopportune times :bonk:

PMZONER
12-08-2011, 11:35 AM
The velcro strap mod sounds good.:yes:

VetteLT193
12-08-2011, 03:49 PM
I clip mine around my wrist. Not driving like an a$$hole is better insurance though.

John C in PA
12-08-2011, 05:47 PM
[ QUOTE=$originalposter]The velcro strap mod sounds good.:yes:[/QUOTE].

My local boat shop sells the straps for a buck. They even have a sewn-in loop for the dog clip on the end of your lanyard.

John C

Donzi Vol
12-10-2011, 02:59 PM
I always wear it. No exceptions. I used to only wear it when alone, but realized that only endangers my passengers AND me.

I have a few reasons:
1) It's an easy insurance policy, God forbid I get thrown out
2) It's basic boating safety
3) I have to justify installing that friggin thing! It was a pain...but well worth it

Kirbyvv
12-12-2011, 09:48 AM
I hook it up each time, just like my seat belt in the car. I feel like something is missing if it's not hooked up. I've got a velcro strap and use the ankle technique too.

younger
12-12-2011, 12:08 PM
A few years back in the middle of the night a young lad hit my parents dock at about 50mph. The dock is a crib that is 6 feet deep 21 feet long and 18 feet wide filled with bolders and covered in cedar. He moved the dock 2 feet. The boat was stuffed into the dock and the boat was still at full throttle. Do you know what it is like turning a boat off at full throttle in gear in the dark. Boat was a brand new Rinker so it had a teather but not worn. So wear your cord if not for yourself for the guy that is first on the seen to help.

Ghost
12-12-2011, 03:04 PM
I suppose the smart money is to put it on or check before going up on plane, and to take it off when coming off. That provides a reminder, and keeps you from the dangers of having it on by accident while docking.

In some boats I think it's not a bad idea, but may not warrant the downside risks (like accidental instant-off when switching drivers) if the boat is big enough, going slowly enough, and the conditions are good.

Night cruising or a stepped hull might be good reason to wear it all the time on plane, regardless of those downside risks.

Then there's the question about accidentally hitting the throttles, a potential problem anytime I suppose.

In slow 24s, like I'm used to, I think it's a lot less needed than in, say, a hot 18. But I plan to put one in anyhow.

jstrahn
12-12-2011, 06:00 PM
So am I the only one that kills my boat at least once per day out on the water when I forgot to remove the lanyard? :screwy:

I wear mine at all times unless I'm idling.

maddad
12-12-2011, 09:01 PM
So am I the only one that kills my boat at least once per day out on the water when I forgot to remove the lanyard?

I wear mine at all times unless I'm idling.

Usually once a day. Mine is down low and attaches to my ankle so it only gets me if I try and leave the drivers seat area. Also, mine is a switch that gets tripped and can be reset by anyone left in the boat for a quick restart even though the strap left with me.

mattyboy
12-13-2011, 07:05 AM
the one I just added to the hornet replaced one of the two factory installed cigarette lighters( I did not want to drill holes). It seems to be in a good location to use on my left wrist and doesn't get in the way with throttle or steering controls. very limited time testing and if it does get in the way I will probably mount it near or in the floor and use the ankle method. I did find a few years ago a neoprene wrist bracelet floatie key chain thingy that works great as a laynard strap comfortable and strong.

CHACHI
12-14-2011, 06:57 AM
Wear one now, after all, what are the odds of pinballing around in the cockpit and hitting the kill switch twice?

Ken

JimG
12-14-2011, 07:39 AM
Always. Period.

We lost a Poker-Run participant a few years ago, because he was not wearing one. Wife knocked unconscious, he was almost flung out... He hung on the side of the boat while circling until his arms gave out. Prop got him.

I often tried to imagine what it must've been like to know the consequences of not wearing a kill switch, while waiting for your arms to tire...

jl1962
12-14-2011, 08:55 AM
Wow - that's an image that will stay with me......

mattyboy
12-14-2011, 09:09 AM
I believe if you search here you'll find a story from Scott Boldts on an episode he had of almost being tossed out of his 18. well actually if I recall correctly he did get tossed out of the boat but was able to hang onto the rail nand gunwale from outside the boat and eventually got to the throttle.

it happens quickly , sometimes it happens in the boat the seat lets loose, a stuff and a plant into the dash. I was always glad my 16 driver seat was bolted to the floor it was lower so I was more in the boat but even that fact isn't enough to not have a lanyard.

Planetwarmer
12-16-2011, 12:33 AM
Years ago there was some feller riding a waverunner with his toddler. The kid grabbed the throttle and the dad fell off the back. He wasnt wearing a lanyard. The kid held the throttle wide open, scared sh##less. Luckily, a bassboater (or we could change it to a Donzi driver) saw the whole thing and was able to chase the kid down before he hit the rocky shore wall. He leaped from his boat, tackling the kid. They both survived.

The problem with not wearing a lanyard in a boat, is if you fall out you kill someone else. Its like ejecting out of a plane just before it hits a park full of people. You may survive, but what about the other people your un-manned missile hits. At the very least, your boat will be destroyed.

glashole
09-07-2012, 07:38 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQpq1_pfIgk&sns=em