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silverghost
12-04-2011, 09:01 PM
Poll:
Do you use your electric powered bilge blower ???
Supposedly you must run your bilge blower at least THREE Min. before starting your boat's inboard engine. according to the warning on my boat's keyswitch panel.

Because of the leaking & rusting/corroding gas tank issues our old Donzi speedboats are know for; and because the ethanol now in much of our fuel supply is know degrading rubber fuel lines, carb power valves, accel pumps, fuel pump diaphrams, etc. & other fuel system parts I thought I would start this Poll to see where our forum members stand on ACUTUALLY USING their electric powered bilge blowers ?

I have seen at least six boats that had exploded, and/or burned to the waterline over the last 50+ years from bilge gasoline fumes & fuel leaks .

All feedback, boat burning , or explosion stories, & opinions are welcome.

f_inscreenname
12-04-2011, 11:27 PM
1st start is always done with the motor box open (want to make sure nothing is squirting out that shouldn't be). After that ....no.
I to have watched a couple boats burn to the waterline. Both happen to be outboards.

maddad
12-04-2011, 11:37 PM
The switch is on like the bilge pump switch is on auto. If the battery is on, the blower's running.

Donzi Vol
12-04-2011, 11:48 PM
I always hit the bilge blower, but it's usually not for a full three minutes before firing. Like many of you, the first start-up of the day includes the hatch being open for about a minute as well. I generally do not run the blower when at the fuel dock, as to ensure that I don't accidentally suck any fumes INTO the bilge from the pumps.

glashole
12-05-2011, 08:42 AM
ALWAYS

should have put another one on there that said run blower and also open hatch to check for smell of fumes

Carl C
12-05-2011, 08:51 AM
I put "always" for lack of other options but, like glashole, a lot of times I just open the hatch and stick my head in and do the sniff test and also do a quick visual of everything. My hatch is always up while fueling. Sometimes while anchored I open the hatch to let things air out and cool down. I never start the engine without running the blower or doing the sniff test. BTW, where I boat a properly plumbed and working bilge blower is required by the Coast Guard.

PMZONER
12-05-2011, 10:56 AM
Hatch and Blower 1st start, Hatch and blower at the refuel dock! Watched a nice Baja go up at KY lake last year, only to be followed by the tow boat catching fire pushing the flaming mess away from the fuel dock. Amazing no one got seriously hurt.:angel::toiletpap

mattyboy
12-05-2011, 12:33 PM
I have not seen a reason nor a need to run my bilge blower over the last 3 years.........................

gcarter
12-05-2011, 12:46 PM
That's funny Matty!
Ya probably couldn't if you wanted to.....
Kinda like a certain TR I knw of!

I think mine's in a box.

Dr. David Fleming
12-05-2011, 01:14 PM
Young dentist, wife two kids. Boat exploded from fumes out in the lake. Mom and dad dived overboard or were blown overboard. Children in front cockpit of wildly burning boat. Several boaters came to the rescue and braved the heat and flames pulled off the little boy. The daughter was scared into disfuction. Could not get her and she died in the flames. Body never recovered. Mom and dad sitting in police cruiser filling out report with a look on their faces not to describe. Later they divorced. Whenever I boat on Mullett Lake I think of the missing girl - my Lady of the Lake! Use the damn blower.

Fishermanjm
12-05-2011, 02:38 PM
i will open the hatch before starting,,, i do run the blower if i have been ideling for a while like in port or something like that

biggiefl
12-05-2011, 03:30 PM
My Baja it never worked but I bought a 3" instead of a 4" and never got around to replacing it. I would lift the hatch at startup(check oil, etc) and if going slow for a long while I would just bump the hatch up a couple inches. Baja also had a much larger engine bay.

The 22 I lift the hatch and give a quick sniff at the house while checking oil. When I get to the ramp I turn on the blower, give her some throttle and hit the key. When cruising slow I turn it on as well. Many times I forget to shut it off and she runs all day. Better to be safe than sorry. Mechanic's client blew himself clean out of the boat and damn near died from engine fume blowup. Not sure if boat was totalled but he was f'up up...use it. This was a fairly large boat as well(30+).

Morgan's Cloud
12-05-2011, 06:01 PM
I think blowers provide a sense of false security to too many inexperienced people. Kind of like those bikers who think if they have their headlight on all the time there is some sort of safety bubble around them.

Back in the early 70's I was invited to go out skiing in my friend's boat.. we often went out multiple times day if we could and I was in fact responsible for his dad purchasing the boat and I knew it well.

On that particular day it was his sister and her b/f who wanted to go out and they needed me to make up the legal numbers. First we needed fuel though and once we had finished topping up I prevented the b/f from hitting the starter and I went to open the engine box like I always did (actually keep it open while filling).
I was horrified to be greeted by eye burning gas fumes and the sight of about 5 gallons of gas sloshing around in the bilge. The fill hose had a huge split in it on a bend near the connection on the tank.

IMO , if you've got more than half a teaspoon of fuel in the bilge you need more than a blower !

Sorry about that diatribe , but I hope it's relevant info .

jl1962
12-05-2011, 06:31 PM
Agree with Morgan's Cloud.

I ALWAYS run the blower and I almost always do a quick visual inspection/sniff test before starting. I often run it if I am at idle for a period of time too.

A few years ago at the Lake George Dustoff I was filling up next to another old 16 at the Hague dock. The other 16 was a one owner, mid-'70s boat that the family had trailed out from Michigan. I took my usual 20 gallons and went to pay. When I came back, they were still filling. At first we thought they had a slower pump, but I checked the dial which was about 50' away and they had pumped almost 100 gallons into the bottom of the boat as the hose had gotten disconnected between the deck and the tank! The gas dock guys suddenly became VERY interested, told the owner (whose hand was on the key) to not touch ANYTHING. They called the Fire Dept and towed the boat a 1/4 mile or so to the Hague boat ramp. I ran them 20 miles down the Lake so they could get their car and trailer. The boat was hauled out and the FD captured most of the gas from the stern plug. And they had to pay for all the gas too!

Long story short, the blower is good for fumes, not for leaks. My gas gauge is pretty good, I usually know within a half gallon how much fuel I will need. If more goes in, then something is wrong.

jonzis donzi
12-05-2011, 06:49 PM
Every time I pull up to the launch ramp I flip it on so it runs a good three to five minutes. I also run it every time before I restart out in the lake. Cheap insurance to avoid an explosion in my opinion.

RockyS18
12-05-2011, 07:39 PM
I constantly run my blower because you really can't go wrong with running it a lot, but you can go wrong with running it rarely in my opinion. As stated above it is not for leaks and I do still inspect for leaks, however it does help with the fumes.

Kirbyvv
12-06-2011, 09:39 AM
Someone posted some photos a few years back of their 16 burning, when a friend started it after filling it with gas and not using the blower. it burned to the water line. Those photos were an eye opener for me. I tried to find the post, but couldn't track it down. I always use the blower, but will admit not for a full 3 minutes.

mattyboy
12-06-2011, 12:51 PM
Kirby,
i remember that thread. I always check the bilge before starting& run the blower and check the bilge after gassing up then run the blower as well. I did have an issue with a gas leak and had it not been for my routine of checking out the bilge it could have been bad. The old fords have a fuel filter that is a metal canister this canister has a filter element that goes in it and it is part of or right next to the fuel pump ( mech). that canister was filled with little shards of the inside of the tank and a solvent that comes from the ethanol . that eventually caused 2 pin holes in the canister letting gas drip into the bilge. your fuel system needs to be able to handle the abuse the boat takes and the abuse of new fuels.
after finding that the deck was split and the tank and all of the fuel lines were replaced to ethanol compatible stuff.

also know your boat if anything is unusual don't do the usual . stop and check why Just like Jay said pay attention to the little things that are a sign of big trouble.

pipnit
12-06-2011, 12:55 PM
I ALWAYS open the hatch, put my sniffer down there, turn on the battery then let the blower run as I get the boat ready.

I saw a city Fireman blow his boat up a couple years back because he didn't use the blower. It didn't burn to the water but the engine hatch did go about 30' in the air and all of his wires and anything else plastic was just roached. Fireman, lol.

Lowflyn
12-06-2011, 01:47 PM
I wish there was a sensor - sensitive enough to automatically turn on blower. Like a smoke detector or carbon monoxide detector to activate the blower

jl1962
12-06-2011, 02:50 PM
Here's a link to the thread on the '67 Ski Sporter :garfield: that burned.

http://www.donzi.net/forums/showthread.php?49495-sad-day-for-all-who-appreciate-a-classic-donzi&highlight=blower+fire

Morgan's Cloud
12-06-2011, 06:47 PM
I saw a city Fireman blow his boat up a couple years back because he didn't use the blower. It didn't burn to the water but the engine hatch did go about 30' in the air and all of his wires and anything else plastic was just roached. Fireman, lol.

As I hinted at in my previous post , it's unlikely that his blower would have saved him even if he had run it .

Explosions like that are not caused by the slight odour of fuel from a plastic tank that 'breathes' a little. Unless your blower is the size of one of those fans they use on Hollywood film sets to simulate hurricane force winds they just can't move the volume of air needed to clear the bilge of saturated gas fumes if you have an actual leak in the system.

False security .

RockyS18
12-06-2011, 09:00 PM
Originally posted by jl1962: "Here's a link to the thread on the '67 Ski Sporter :garfield: that burned.

http://www.donzi.net/forums/showthre...ht=blower+fire"

(http://www.donzi.net/forums/showthread.php?49495-sad-day-for-all-who-appreciate-a-classic-donzi&highlight=blower+fire)
I wonder what ever happened to Yellowdonzi67. I guess since he has not been one here in 4 years he never got another one. Such as sad story...

silverghost
12-07-2011, 02:35 AM
Lowflyn~
Fireboy Xintex makes an electronic marine bilge & engine compartment gasoline fume dectector with an additional relay to turn on your bilge blower in the event any gasoline fumes are detected in your bilge , or engine compartment .
The electronics head control unit is dash ,or bulkhead, mounted with a remote wired detector placed in your engine compartment's bilge.

Fireboy Xintex model # MB-1-R
I see it sells for approx. $160-$190 online.

Has anyone ever had one of these gasoline fume detector units on their boat ?

mattyboy
12-07-2011, 11:38 AM
the best safety equipment your boat can have is YOU. the more you try and do things automatically the more things go wrong. your ears eyes and nose is the best thing to use. stick your head in the bilge first start up and always after a fill up and I learned to do this after very hard runs as well.

in 1000 islands after a really rough run my battery strap broke and the battery was resting on top of the motor it flipped up out of the box and came to rest on the intake and exhaust manifolds.

talk about sparks flying try to get it out of there. it pays to look around everyonce in a while on a daily basis.

Jraysray
12-07-2011, 12:00 PM
Open hatch and look around as well. I always open the hatch pre and post running just to see whats going on in there. I do forget sometimes.

maddad
12-07-2011, 12:40 PM
Just to clear up what a blower does...
Gasoline is volotile. It creates a vapor that is heavier than air. This vapor is very explosive. The blower, if it's hose is down at the lowest part of the bilge, will remove all the vapor even if there's 2" of gas sloshing around, and prevent an explosion. The fuel may still catch fire and burn, but that's easier to see and get away from or put out, as opposed to a violent explosion that can send people and burning fuel all over the place.
RUN YOUR BLOWER!

John C in PA
12-07-2011, 02:59 PM
I use my blower for every start, usually after a long WOT run, and after fueling up. I probably leave my blower on much longer than it needs to be since the switch is behind me (Sweet 16) and its EZ to forget. I figger in hot weather it can't hurt to remove some heat from the bilge and give the carb somewhat cooler air to breathe anyway.

Matty, I agree nothing beats common sense safety procedures (like popping the hatch to check for leaks), but a full time air sampling device like the one silverghost mentioned is cheap insurance in the instance of a leak developing during the day. I like the idea too that it will start the blower automatically if the fume level is too high. I found these for $145 online.

John C

mattyboy
12-08-2011, 08:55 AM
Adding technology adds complication to the system KISS has always been my motto. I work with tech stuff all day long The more tech stuff added just adds more points of failure How many people test their auto bilge switch and bilge pump by filling the bilge with water. Or is it just piece of mind I left it in auto funny my boat sunk. My point besides the warm fuzzy it gives you. What ongoing maint and testing needs to be done to keep the sensor functioning?

VetteLT193
12-08-2011, 09:14 AM
If I remember correctly TidBart has that fume detector installed on his 22. It auto runs the blower, nice little setup.

I use my blower before starting and generally while idling.

I do NOT open the hatch while fueling. Gas fumes are heavier than air... the whole problem with boats is the fumes sink to the bottom of the bilge so I don't want it open to allow the fumes in and down to the bottom of the engine room. The general rule of thumb is all hatches should be closed while fueling.

John C in PA
12-08-2011, 10:12 AM
(Quotes don't work so this is in reply to Mattyboy). Here's a link to the nanufacturers install and op manual http://www.fireboy-xintex.com/manuals/mb1.pdf. I like the part that you can test the sensor yourslf using a butane lighter (not lit of course :nilly:). The MSRP for a replacement sensor is $100 but I'm sure a web search wil find a better price.

John C

silverghost
12-08-2011, 11:10 AM
I have never owned any boat with an electronic gasoline fume detector installed.
I do however have Halon gas automatic fogging fire extinguishers on all my boats under the motorboxes & in the engine compartments.
I was forced to install one by a classic boat insurance company before they would underwrite a policy on a very rare 1930s mahogany cockpit runabout I owned at that time.
Good thing it was installed in that very boat.
It actually discharged automatically about 15 years ago and saved us, & our boat, from a catastrophic engine fire.~~~But that's another long story for another thread.

But~ For that little amount of money I think an electronic fuel fume sniffer would give you an extra level of safety protection. Just like a smoke , or CO detecor in your home.
Countless lives are saved annually from these detectors ?
You have to ask yourself~
Is your, or your family's, life & safety worth spending an extra $150.-$190 ?
I'd also bet that this electronic gasoline fume sniffer unit could detect gasoline fumes long before your nose actually could ?

With such a long history of foamed-in gas tank rust & corrosion pin hole leak issues that our older Donzis have I think it might also be a very good idea.

The detector sensors on these electronic gasoline fume detection units is a plug-in style remote detector.
I suspect that if it gets splashed with any water/saltwater in your bilge~ It would be wrecked & would need replacment.
Do these sensors also wear-out, or age, in time ?
I do not know ?

But~
If we all shunned modern Hi -Tech. innovations we would all still have sails , or one lung hit-or-miss engines, in our boats & be driving Ford Model "T"s to work~~~or worse yet~ still be using gas & oil lamps in our homes. ; )

mattyboy
12-08-2011, 12:48 PM
[ QUOTE=$originalposter]silverghost
I have never owned any boat with an electronic gasoline fume detector installed.
But~ For that little amount of money I think it would give you an extra level of safety protection. Just like a smoke , or CO detecor in your home.
You have to ask yourself~
Is your, or your family's life & safety worth spending an extra $150.-$190 ?
I'd also bet that this unit could detect gasoline fumes long before your nose ?

With such a long history of foamed-in gas tank rust & corrosion pin hole leak issues that our older Donzis have I think it might also be a very good idea.

The sensors on these electronic fume detection units is a plug-in sryle remote detector.
I suspect that if it gets splashed with any water/saltwater in your bilge~ It would be wrecked & would need replacment.
Do these sensors also wear-out, or age, in time ?
I do not know ?

But~
If we all shunned modern Hi -Tech. innovations we would all still have sails , or one lung hit-or-miss engines, in our boats & be driving Ford Model "T"s to work~~~or worse yet~ still be using gas & oil lamps in our homes. ; )
{$pagetext}[/QUOTE]


sorry I'm not the type to turn things over to technology and let it run the show. so now add to your daily routine testing the sensor with a cigarette lighter REALLY????. If they get wet they get damaged??so what do you think the chances of the sensor getting wet in the bottom of the bilge??? sorry I value my family more than that, to put their fate in the hands of a $100 sensor . Now a hand held sensor that can be poked around in the bilge then stored in a safe environment and tested calibrated and such might interest me.

smoke detectors and co detectors are great tools but they need maint how many horror stories do you hear of loss of life due to dead batteries? they also are hung in a pretty tame environment too. not bounced around and soaked on occassion.

Technology is good to a point than you have to count on yourself . People count on technology to do for them and when it fails it fails big time. perfect example technology overiding human input



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iF6Osr9NOM

silverghost
12-08-2011, 01:37 PM
Matty~
I am NOT saying you are wrong in your thinking on this issue here~
In fact for all my long boating life throught the decades since the 1950s I have been doing exactly what you say you always do.
I always inspect my engine, & bilge for gasoline fumes, ; fuel & water,oil leaks etc. I also check engine oil & antifreeze levels etc.
Also~~~ I especially check for gasoline fuel fumes after re-fueling & for the first run of the day etc.

In addition to the automatic Halon gas fogging extinguisher units I have also installed a gasoline ball shut-off valve just before my fuel filter & fuel pump.
Before I leave my boat for the day, or week, I always turn off the fuel line valve~~~
Just in case a leak develops while I am away from the boats.

I also agee that the boat owner/captain should always be the primary first level safety inspector.

The way I look at these electronic gasoline fume sniffers~~~
They are just an extra added level of safety protection you can easily, and cheaply, add to your boat.
You can never have enough, or too many, safety items on any boat.

The boat's owner/captain should always be the very FIRST & PRIMARY level of safety protection like you suggest.

handfulz28
12-08-2011, 02:31 PM
Formula has installed fume detectors for decades; automatic extinguishers also. The sensors do go bad so I wouldn't trust my life with them. But the fume detector can be a good indicator if something goes wrong while running. Should never replace your eyes and nose.

I don't understand "open hatch while fueling," especially with forward deck fills and tanks.

What kills me with bilge blowers is the intake hose routing (when there's actually something there.) The gas leak and fumes are most likely going to be contained between the stringers, since that's where most fuel plumbing is. Yet how many have their intake hoses down there? How is a blower mounted outside the stringer or better yet on the gunwale, and even better without an intake hose, going to be effective at removing fumes?

The other part of the equation = sparks. You can't ever compromise with the starter and alternator and any other wiring/electronics in the bilge. If you don't make sparks, you won't have fire.

zipper
12-08-2011, 06:13 PM
Hi guys :smash:

I'm new here and have a 1999 22' classic that i purchased this past summer. I have been following this bilge blower thread & decided I'd like that extra degree of safty afforded by one of these detectors.

While searching ebay I found the above model for $129.99 with free shipping and the option of a "Best Offer".... Long story short... I offered $100.00 & he accepted.

There where only 2 left after I purchased mine.. so if anyone else is interested... the link to that page is below.
Cheers
Brian

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649

Ghost
12-11-2011, 09:05 AM
I'm with you on everything except "I don't understand "open hatch while fueling," especially with forward deck fills and tanks."

If something were going wrong below and fuel was spilling, I think having the motorbox open would get the bad news to your nose more quickly, right? In classics with the tank up front (and maybe that's what you mean) I suppose you'd most likely get your first whiffs of that from the opening below the dash rather than the motorbox. For anything with the tank as far aft as the cockpit, I'd think an open motorbox might tell you quickest since the fuel will be headed that way.

I also would think that if something were going wrong already, like a slow leak in the bottom of the tank, opening the motorbox would be a way to realize it before dumping more fuel in.

EDIT: All that said, I don't think any of my boats have said to open the motorbox when fueling, and I don't. (The modern Cobalt would have been impossible, just due to the fill location. The Nova and Cig are way old, pre-warning labels I think, and I don't have any owner's manuals.) But I do stick my nose in the motorbox before and after filling.

joseph m. hahnl
12-11-2011, 09:40 AM
Some times you need to follow proper procedures, that are proven, rather than making it up as you go along. every one has common sense/cents but having a $hit load of pennies in a jar doesn't replace brains.

I'm not trying to start in on anybody,But the bottom line is, If your fueling with the blower on and the hatch open. You need to re-read your safety boaters manual. What else are are you failing to do? I totally agree with Matty about, you as the operator is the most important safety tool in your boat. I do think that an automatic device would be beneficial,but agree that, as with all things, failure would be eminent. This thread has made me think that my blower hose needs attention and maintenance. I rarely use my blower on start up but always use it while idling underway. This exercise will now be modified. and the blower will go on immediately when I enter the boat. and will not go off until the boat reaches speed.Remember there isn't any over kill in safety a little extra goes along way especially when your life is riding on it.



Boating Basics: Before Going Out


Fueling a Vessel (http://www.donzi.net/forums/#)
Fueling a PWC (http://www.donzi.net/forums/#fuelingPWC)
Fuel Selector Switch on a PWC (http://www.donzi.net/forums/#fuelselector)
Backfire Flame Arrestors (http://www.donzi.net/forums/#flame)
Fueling a Vessel

Never fuel at night unless it is an emergency. If you must refuel after dark, use only electric lights. Try to refuel away from the water or on a commercial fueling ramp.
Before beginning to fuel:

Dock the boat securely and ask all passengers to exit.
Do not allow anyone to smoke or strike a match.
Check all fuel lines, connections, and fuel vents.
Turn off anything that might cause a spark—engines, fans, or electrical equipment.
Shut off all fuel valves and extinguish all open flames, such as galley stoves and pilot lights.
Close all windows, ports, doors, and other openings to prevent fumes from entering the boat.
Remove portable fuel tanks and fill them on the dock.
While filling the fuel tank:

Keep the nozzle of the fuel-pump hose in contact with the tank opening to prevent producing a static spark.
Avoid spilling fuel into the boat's bilge or the water.
Never fill a tank to the brim—leave room to expand.
The most important safe fueling practice ...
If your vessel is equipped with a power ventilation system, turn it on for at least four minutes both after fueling and before starting your engine to remove gas vapors in the bilge.
After fueling:

Wipe up any spilled fuel.
Open all windows, ports, doors, and other openings.

mattyboy
12-11-2011, 10:30 AM
if the fuel fill system has failed it will run to the bilge fairly quickly in a smaller classic. it will get there either outboard of the stringers or over the top of the tank and foam into the center bulkhead and then thru to the bilge. I have seen some projects have gussets added on the outboard side of the stringers . these gussets need to be able to pass fluids that might gather outside of the stringers to the bilge. The one reason I don't agree with the foamed in tank is that it doesn't allow any water or fuel that gathers in that bulkhead to leave. The older boats had a pipe glassed in to pass water from the front bulkhead under the tank thru the pipe into the center bulkhead.

some good points brought out here.

how many follow this

everybody out while fueling?

is your fuel fill and tank grounded?

are your fuel connection hoses double clamped?

is your fuel vent functioning?

is your fuel system ethanol compatible?

gcarter
12-11-2011, 11:44 AM
Good drainage is very important. When installing lugs, or gussets, I cut a 2" X 2" "rat hole" in the inner bottom corner before installation.
Ditto on the fuel tanks. The original 3/4" PVC drain pipe was NOT glassed in, but instead, installed w/double sided foam tape which always leaked. At least they were during the Chisholm and Staples Donzi ownership.
First, the 3/4" pipe is too small (less than 1/2 square inch of area) to flow any meaningful amount of liquid.
Second, the double sided foam tape would leak water and anything else into the tank compartment which corroded the completely unprotected tank.
The solution is very simple; enlarge the drain pipe bulkhead holes to 1 3/8" diameter to enable a 1" thinwall PVC pipe to be epoxied into the two bulkheads. No more liquids in the tank compartment.
And if your new tank is coated w/coal tar epoxy before foaming in, it'll be completely safe for the rest of your life.

mattyboy
12-11-2011, 12:15 PM
george yes glassed in was probably not the right term my 67 had the piped epoxied in place at each end and held by the foam . my point was with a 16 the tank is partially under the used floor and water will drain into the tank compartment. that compartment is sealed with foam so where does that water drain to??? the pipe and foam stop that water from draining to the next compartment.yes a tar epoxied tank is protected for some time but what happens to a leaky sender gasket or a slightly cracked fuel fill? I always felt that the tank replacement in my 16 with support blocks and having that compartment drain freely to the next compartment was the best thing. the tank was properly supported and if it failed catistrophically that fact would be evidenced immediately in the bilge not to hide and build up to become a bigger problem.but that is another discussion. the main point would be know the status of your fuel system and know the specific issues it might have so you can avoid a dangerous situation.

zipper
12-12-2011, 10:53 AM
Have been following this thread and find itquite interesting. The numerous opinionsand remarks concerning “blower use” have me rethinking my own habits.
I'll admit... I never used that little toggle switch allthat much, and maybe I should be for the safety of at least the passengers thatI carry.

In conjunction with the blowers, the use of anelectronic device such as the previously mentioned Fireboy Xintex MB-1 can’t do any harm and may just alert me to a catastrophic failure while on my boat.
I started searching for one of these units& found one on the auctions. It was listed for $129.99 but it had a make “MakeOffer” option on the auction…. Anyways... long story short… I made an offer of $100.00and he accepted. There were 3 available & I took one, so there should be 2more still available.

Here is a link to that auction should anyonebe interested.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649)

zipper
12-12-2011, 11:00 AM
Have been following this thread and find itquite interesting. The numerous opinionsand remarks concerning “blower use” have me rethinking my own habits.
I never used that little toggle switch allthat much, and maybe I should be for the safety of at least the passengers thatI carry.
In conjunction with the blowers, the use of anelectronic device such as the previously mentioned Fireboy Xintex MB-1 can’t doany harm and may just alert me to a catastrophic failure while on my boat.
I started searching for one of these units& found one on the auctions. It was listed for $129.99 but it had a make “MakeOffer” option on the auction…. Anyways... long story short… I made an offer of $100.00and he accepted. There were 3 available & I took one, so there should be 2more still available.
Here is a link to that auction should anyonebe interested.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649)

zipper
12-12-2011, 12:06 PM
Have been following this thread and find itquite interesting. The numerous opinionsand remarks concerning “blower use” have me rethinking my own habits.
I've got to admit that I never used that little toggle switch allthat much, and maybe I should be for the safety of at least the passengers thatI carry.
In conjunction with the blowers, the use of anelectronic device such as the previously mentioned Fireboy Xintex MB-1 can’t doany harm and may just alert me to a catastrophic failure while on my boat.
I started searching for one of these units& found one on the auctions. It was listed for $129.99 but it had a make “MakeOffer” option on the auction…. Anyways... long story short… I made an offer of $100.00and he accepted. There were 3 available & I took one, so there should be 2more still available.
Here is a link to that auction should anyonebe interested..

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/400261358368?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649)

blue boat
12-13-2011, 12:20 PM
I have no use in it most of time. Trailering the boat vents the engine compartment well enough I think:crossfing::crossfing:

Ghost
12-14-2011, 04:48 PM
I did some math once with my twin smallblock Nova and my recollection is that somewhere between idle (600) and 1000 RPM, the motors were turning the air over in there far better than any blower setup could ever hope to. Just cu. ft. per minute calculation.

Singles have more volume to worry about in most engine compartments and move half the air, so maybe blower at idle matters on some.

blackhawk
12-15-2011, 01:58 PM
just to clear up what a blower does...
Gasoline is volotile. It creates a vapor that is heavier than air. This vapor is very explosive. The blower, if it's hose is down at the lowest part of the bilge, will remove all the vapor even if there's 2" of gas sloshing around, and prevent an explosion. The fuel may still catch fire and burn, but that's easier to see and get away from or put out, as opposed to a violent explosion that can send people and burning fuel all over the place.
Run your blower!

x100

Ghost
12-16-2011, 02:47 PM
Just dawned on me that my post above could be confusing. I was talking about my motors turning the air over when operating at idle speeds. Which I think is true. Between the amount of air the motors move, and the hoses from the air intakes down into the bilge, it seems likely to be as good or better than a blower. Hence, I don't usually run my blower when poking around off plane.

BUT I was not suggesting the motors could in any way be a substitute for blower use before starting. (Which would make no sense at all. Boom.)

gcarter
12-20-2011, 03:24 PM
Mike, that was probably truer in the '20's and '30's when engines were largely in-line and had up-draft carbs. The carbs were pulling air from near the bottom of the engine.

Engines today have down draft carbs on V type engines (w/your boat as the exception) and pulls air in from the top of the engine compartment. So it doesn't pull air from the bottom of the compartent.
Of course, none of this should make any difference if you never had a leak of any kind, or a carb that vented vapors to the atmosphere.

I suppose the forward facing cowls should have hoses leading to the bilge so the incoming air never gets short circuited.

gcarter
12-20-2011, 04:27 PM
A couple of examples of what I'm talking about:.........

http://www.donzi.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=16892&d=1135534228

http://www.donzi.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=16893&d=1135534228

Ghost
12-21-2011, 12:45 AM
Thanks George, that's useful. My boat actually has an interesting hose setup from the vents...now I have to look at it a bit more closely.

All that stuff aside, nobody runs the blower in any boats at speed, right? So, at some point, even with the downdraft carbs drawing from the top of the motorbox, there must be a point where raw air turnover is assumed to be large enough that the blower isn't needed, right? Or is the assumption that hoses are directing the air entering the motorbox down to the bilge, or both?

maddad
12-21-2011, 08:47 AM
Ghost, I run my blower all the time. Gasoline vapor is not something you want down in the bilge. The key is having the hose the blower is drawing from at the lowest and furthest back spot in the bilge.

mattyboy
12-21-2011, 09:58 AM
another thing to look for that the end of the hose is not obstructed .if the end of the hose lays flush with the floor it can be blocked by junk a rag an oil blotter or other stuff even water in the bilge can block or deminish it effectiveness.

Moody Blu'
03-11-2012, 01:02 PM
always! I also check under the hatch for fumes all the time after fueling. I've been known to even stick my head down near the bilge and take a whiff too. I can see why a blower would be used at idle,but at speed there is enough intake andouttake fro the airvents as well as suction from the speed and puls air in from the cockpit, up to the front and then back out the rear vents.

In my case my hood is cut for my carb and I have the hood scoop to cover it. that hood scoop gave me 100 rpm more under full throttle and another 100rpm with the 1" twirl velocity stack. SO there is plenty of air while your at speed which is either creating a suction or forcing air in certain places. But hey if it makes you feel safer with it on all the time go for it. I for one have had problems in the past and had alternators die on me and always think about the battery and keeping it used as little as possible in case an alternator does die I can idle back to saftey a little further then if the bower was being used and lower the charge of the battery due to constant blower use whie the alt was working. I dunno, just sayin..

donzidon
05-01-2013, 11:41 PM
I don't trust the blower and always open the hatch. Once the engine fires, it is sucking so much air that I think my blower doesn't add much. However, it certainly couldn't hurt. My problem is once I turn the blower on, I usually forget to turn it off.

Always good to remember that the most explosive mixture is when you can barely smell it. Something like 12-13:1. I heard some horror stories growing up, but I can't say that I know of any recent examples. Since the lobster boats and cabin cruisers started switching to diesels. Be safe out there.

BUIZILLA
05-02-2013, 08:00 AM
there was a pretty horrific explosion in Ft. Lauderdale last week when the owner of a 40' Mainship cruiser woke up to fumes, and switched his bilge pump on, instead of the blower... took out 3 boats in a blazing fireball, and he is still hospitalized with 2nd and 3rd degreee burns...

mattyboy
05-02-2013, 08:49 AM
always good to remember that the older fuel systems was never designed to last forever or deal with today's fuels


bringing this back up as some maynot read the entire thread this was posted here earlier by Jay

http://www.donzi.net/forums/showthread.php?49495-sad-day-for-all-who-appreciate-a-classic-donzi&highlight=sad+day+for+anyone+who+loves+a+classic

Pismo
05-10-2013, 05:37 PM
I am awaiting the return of the Straight 8 for twin applications so no staggering needed. Would be cool but lots of load on that long crank.