PDA

View Full Version : Survey done bad news



jetnjester
12-20-2010, 01:45 PM
Well just got the call "the boat is beautiful, looks great but it has 60%-70% moisture in the transom, and 2 outboard stringers in the engine compartment - but she looks great". Looks like she is out of contention unless yu guys know some cheap glass guys.

gcarter
12-20-2010, 03:12 PM
Moisture dopesn't necessarily mean it's rotted.
many times the transom lower glass, along w/the rear inner glass can be partially removed and the wood allowed to dry.
The rot issue needs to be determined.
Then the repairs can include where the water is coming from and the proper repairs made.
Just depends, it may be fine.

Just Say N20
12-20-2010, 03:44 PM
Ditto to what George said. I had a Checkmate once that pegged the moisture meter at max.

At the suggestion of all the "smart" people I asked, I cut the back off the transom, and about a 1/2 gallon of water drained out. I started to remove the wood, which didn't look black at all, and found it to be as solid as a rock. There was no de-lamination, no rot, nothing except for wet wood. I could have probably drilled a few holes thru the outer fiberglass, let it dry over the winter, seal it up and have been good.

If you don't want the expense of redoing the stringers and the transom, about your only option would be to purchase a boat that someone else had done (correctly) in the past 5 years. Because of the expense that person put into the boat, it will command a more premium price.

These boats can be as much as 46 years old, and we have learned a lot about boat building techniques in those years, so you can't really expect one to have survived in pristine condition.

Its all part of the fun (disease) anyway.

jetnjester
12-20-2010, 04:11 PM
well thats good news - in a way. I just spoke with Donzi and the gentleman told me about a product West Systems that I could also try - drill holes into the areas affected and squirt this in and it will strngthen the area. You guys ever heard of that?

gcarter
12-20-2010, 08:17 PM
well thats good news - in a way. I just spoke with Donzi and the gentleman told me about a product West Systems that I could also try - drill holes into the areas affected and squirt this in and it will strngthen the area. You guys ever heard of that?

Such a product is for rotted wood that has lost most of its fibers.
It would still have to be dried first.
Wood will dry faster if some air is allowed to ge to it.
It might take weeks, or a couple of months for good drying.
If you buy the boat, open up some of the glass and let it happen.
Then re-cover the opened areas, this is one of the easiest glass repairs to make.
Then re-seal ALL the holes.

GBond
12-21-2010, 06:11 AM
As much as you like the boat... I'd IMO, move on. There are plenty on deals to be had. The risk factor is to high!

MOP
12-21-2010, 10:04 AM
You could also reduce the price enough to make proper repairs and really know what you have, all others will still have some mystery to them!

Pismo
12-21-2010, 10:47 AM
It is a great negotiating point.

rustnrot
12-21-2010, 11:31 AM
Anything short of removing the old wood and reglassing it all is a compromise. As a minimum, the old wet wood is probably not sticking to the fiberglass skin very well anymore and won't magically "restick" once dry. There has almost got to be some rot in there, it just may not seem very advanced.

Assume you or someone else will have to replace the transom and part or all of the stringers and make offer accordingly. It is very possible and even likely someone else will offer more money as many are in denial as to the extent of repairs necessary or they think a "quick fix" will be ok when it rarely, if ever, is. To make matters worse, these "quick fixes" always result in harder-to-repair-correctly adventures later.

Either get it for a silly low price or move on.

Dr. David Fleming
12-21-2010, 02:38 PM
West System is a remarkable wood repair product - I have personally used it to restore a number of antique wood speedboats from the 1920's - I will do to wood what is beyond your dreams - better than the original in strength and total function restored - weight is on a par with the original wood. However, it will not displace water - and can only be used in totally dry wood.

If the wood is missing it can be bulk filled with "west micro spheres" filler and troweled into the place of the missing wood. it will harden to consistency and strength equal to the missing wood. Colors vary from clear to white depending on filler - West epoxy that has been left exposed to the moisture in the air will turn a brown color.

Now the real issue is repairing a Polyester Fiberglass hull with Epoxy - how compatible are the two plastics? My efforts to use West as a "surface" repair on the fiberglass have caused me to retreat to the polyester camp.

Newer Donzi's don't use balsa core but use some type of polyester box coring that does not hold water.

gcarter
12-21-2010, 03:44 PM
Glass w/ester resin never sticks to wood very well.
I think you would find that most older bonded glass/wood, even where it appears to be well bonded has no real strength compared to epoxy.
But in the case of wood cores for stringers, it's not expremnely important.
It's mainly there to keep the glass skins apart and for compression strength for engine mounts, etc.

GBond
12-21-2010, 04:45 PM
Some of these replies are honestly, well kinda concern me.

Obviously the transom and stringers need over hauled and I'm sure the

floor is wet also. Anyone want to quote a price on fixing all that.

Let's make a list on what needs to be done.

Quality wasn't the priority in 88'.

MOP
12-21-2010, 04:51 PM
Some of these replies are honestly, way the phuck out in left field.

Obviously the transom and stringers need over hauled and I'm sure the

floor is wet also. Anyone want to quote a price on fixing all that.

Let's make a list on what needs to be done.

Quality control wasn't the priority in 88'.

Matches my thoughts, get estimates the seller must come down or hope to put the screws to someone else. If you can negotiate a decent number it can be repaired better then when it was new, like I said in my other post that is the only way you will know what you have and the bills to prove it.

gcarter
12-21-2010, 07:37 PM
Some of these replies are honestly, way the phuck out in left field.

Obviously the transom and stringers need over hauled and I'm sure the

floor is wet also. Anyone want to quote a price on fixing all that.

Let's make a list on what needs to be done.

Quality control wasn't the priority in 88'.

The glass layup in Donzi boats was insuficient in the '80's. Period.
Any boat from that era, w/more than 250 HP needs more glass in the stringers and bottom. The stringer bottoms need to be filled and about 200-300% more glass added to the stringers.
Donzi relied too much on the stringer wood for strength instead the glass that covered it. Ask Don about large yachts and their hollow glass stringers. The wood in the stringers should just be core material, and provide compression strength for engine mounts, nothing more.
I'm not, nor never did subscribe to leaving rotted wood in the stringers and transom. All I did say was that perfectly good wet wood needn't be replaced if it can be dried and sealed properly.
The other thing I said was that glass material layed up w/any kind of ester resin doesn't adhere to any kind of wood very well, particularly compared to epoxy which adheres extremely well. There is all sorts of reference material to back this up.
I would also say, in a perfect world, the stringer core could be looked at like a male mold, something to lay glass on. The main strength should be in the glass, not the wood inside it.
This is NOT any where near left field.

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-21-2010, 08:12 PM
Jetnjester , just curious where is your location ? Hey guy , the bottom line is if you can get the boat for a better price because of the repairs needed it can and could be a walk in the park doing these repairs yourself and to tell you the truth with everybody posting the way they do .....it can sometimes be very overwhelming and if you feel that this might be an option , we or i can talk you thru this and if the wood gets wet there often is a breakdown in the glue which will cause Delamination in the ply and most of the time completly replacing a damaged stringer is often easier then replacing a section considering most stringers run from the transom to the bulkhead and to tell you the truth doing a transom on a Donzi is a piece of cake and with that in mind when all is said and done at least you will know what has been done which can and will give you piece of mind in the long run and good luck with your decision .

gcarter
12-21-2010, 08:19 PM
Fortunately, Artie, Donzi used almost no plywood in the stringers, but mostly clear pine 1 X 12's. That can make a big difference.
There was ply in the transom.

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-21-2010, 08:37 PM
Fortunately, Artie, Donzi used almost no plywood in the stringers, but mostly clear pine 1 X 12's. That can make a big difference.
There was ply in the transom.George did you mean( unfortunately) and pine? George ,even so if i was to do a repair on a stringer system it would be with Ply or Coosa which is a far better product for stringer's .

gcarter
12-21-2010, 09:03 PM
I like Coosa, but I don't know how well the foam core stands up to compression.

GBond
12-21-2010, 09:12 PM
Let's not minimize the issue here folks.
George, I have much respect for your knowledge and continued accomplishments. But, the stringers and transom are shot and there
is no miracle fix, period.

No Fluff please :biggrin.:

gcarter
12-21-2010, 09:21 PM
Well, if they're shot, they're shot.

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-21-2010, 09:36 PM
I like Coosa, but I don't know how well the foam core stands up to compression. George , are you really sure that you know what Coosa is all about ? George , check it out along with the compression ratio on Coosa's Bluewater # 26 which is awsome http://coosacomposites.com/bluewater.html & to tell you the truth if somebody is working on a budget and want's more strength opposed to using pine ........a good marine ply is a far better choice .

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-21-2010, 09:40 PM
Well, if they're shot, they're shot. Okay George , why are you getting so pissed and are you going to take your toys and go home ?

yeller
12-21-2010, 11:18 PM
Okay George , why are you getting so pissed and are you going to take your toys and go home ?
I never read this as George getting pissed. George stated his opinion....and was told he was "phuckin out in left field".
What happened to having an opinion and giving options...?

Now the stingers may need to be replaced, but a moisture reading doesn't automatically mean the wood is rotten. If I was buying the boat, I would assume they are, but hope they weren't.

Donzigo
12-22-2010, 12:12 AM
To do a complete fiberglass repair on this vessel could be several thousand dollers if done by a qualified craftsman. I had this done on a Donzi Z-25 and the number was $14,000.

Richard

fogducker III
12-22-2010, 12:31 AM
I never read this as George getting pissed. George stated his opinion....and was told he was "phuckin out in left field".
What happened to having an opinion and giving options...?

Now the stingers may need to be replaced, but a moisture reading doesn't automatically mean the wood is rotten. If I was buying the boat, I would assume they are, but hope they weren't.


+1......:popcorn:

CHACHI
12-22-2010, 06:54 AM
Moisture dopesn't necessarily mean it's rotted.
many times the transom lower glass, along w/the rear inner glass can be partially removed and the wood allowed to dry.
The rot issue needs to be determined.
Then the repairs can include where the water is coming from and the proper repairs made.
Just depends, it may be fine.

I thought George qualified his opinon just fine.

Donziweasel
12-22-2010, 09:37 AM
I restored the stringer from the bulkhead back to the transom and part of the transom with Coosa. I also put in two gussets. Love the stuff. It really soaked up the resin and made a fantastic bond. Plus, if it ever gets wet again, it will never rot or lose it's properties. Very easy to shape, used a 4 inch die grinder and could shape it to any shape in seconds. Compression is fine, it has a 540 sitting on the stringers and it is holding up well. It was also worth it for me, a newbie when it comes to glass, because of ease of use.

Listen to George when it comes to glass. He know his stuff and probably has more experience that anyone on here.

gcarter
12-22-2010, 10:01 AM
Well, if they're shot, they're shot.

I was accepting the word of someone who may know more about the particular boat. If the wood is rotted, there's nothing else to do but replace it. I don't know that because I've not seen it. I was just speaking theory, and from personal experiance.
I do like Coosa. I do know about it and have a sample of it (3/4") right beside my desk in my office, I'm looking at it as I'm typing.
I've not made any stringers from it. My only concern would be about crush forces from through bolting engine mounts. I guess I need some experience with it in that application. Of course every bit of anecdotal evidence helps. I've thought about the stuff a lot. I would imagine that laminating two or three pieces of 1/2" w/epoxy would be some wonderful stuff. Not only would the foam core be minimized, but the layers of glass would be maximized.
I don't have anywhere near the experience that Artie has. I'm just a hobbiest, but I enjoy doing all my own work and can't afford to have other people do it for me.

gcarter
12-22-2010, 10:22 AM
to tell you the truth if somebody is working on a budget and want's more strength opposed to using pine ........a good marine ply is a far better choice .

A lot of stringers are made from marine ply. Here's my thoughts on the subject.....
If you look at a stringer made from ply, half of the laminate layers are running longitudinally and add strength to the stringer, the other half run vertically and add no strength. Why not use a piece of wood (if wood is being used) that contributes all its potential strength to the stringer?
Secondly, ply has end grain on all edges, and can potentialy absorb water on all edges as wood really only absorbs water on the end grain, kind of like a soda straw. If a solid, clear board is used for a stringer core, only the ends can absorb water. If the aft end of the solid stringer, and all th holes are sealed w/a thin penetrating epoxy, like System Three Clear-Coat, almost all potential for rot inside the stringer is eliminated.
Just my $0.02.

Pismo
12-22-2010, 10:27 AM
I restored the stringer from the bulkhead back to the transom and part of the transom with Coosa. I also put in two gussets. Love the stuff. It really soaked up the resin and made a fantastic bond. Plus, if it ever gets wet again, it will never rot or lose it's properties. Very easy to shape, used a 4 inch die grinder and could shape it to any shape in seconds. Compression is fine, it has a 540 sitting on the stringers and it is holding up well. It was also worth it for me, a newbie when it comes to glass, because of ease of use.
Listen to George when it comes to glass. He know his stuff and probably has more experience that anyone on here.

So your stringers and part of the transom are now made entirely of Coosa? What epoxy did you use with it? Sounds great, no more rot issues.

GBond
12-22-2010, 11:55 AM
I thought George qualified his opinon just fine.


I agree entirely ....He knows the product, and I have the up most respect.

Edited my post and apologize for any butt hurts...wasn't directed at anyone in particular.

Peace

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-22-2010, 12:13 PM
Hey guys , if ply stringers are fully encapsulated with fabric and sealed properly they should and will last a lifetime..... and as far as Coosa goes two years ago i put a set of four stringers using Coosa's Bluewater 26 in a cruiser and the owner is one of these people who has a tendency to pound the hell out of the boat here on lake Mich and they have held up just fine and to tell you the truth most of the stringer's that i have done in the past.... have been 80 % ply and the other 20% Coosa and the reason being is that most people are shocked by the price of Coosa alone and then there is the price of shipping . Hey guys /George , i would like everyone to know that i am not out to bash anyone here and if i come across a little too strong sometimes i apologize .

Donziweasel
12-22-2010, 07:43 PM
So your stringers and part of the transom are now made entirely of Coosa? What epoxy did you use with it? Sounds great, no more rot issues.

Yep, both stringers, gusets and part of the transom. Stringers were so rotted I could poke my finger through them. Also, much like George's boat, there were massive voids under the stringers as they had not been cut to a 24 degree angle. Where the stringers met the transom, the water would not drain and it pooled. That is where I had my transom rot.

I used Merton's Vinylester with 24 oz bias stitchmat. It turned out really nice, strong as hell, and lighter that before. When I bolted the 540 in, it did not compress a bit or get any cracks.

scippy
12-22-2010, 08:15 PM
I used Merton's Vinylester with 24 oz bias stitchmat. It turned out really nice, strong as hell, and lighter that before. When I bolted the 540 in, it did not compress a bit or get any cracks.

DW,

I just got an order from Merton's, (5 - 1 gal. Vinylester jugs)......it's not the ashland brand, it's different brand bit cheaper........just wondering if that's what you used?

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-22-2010, 08:26 PM
Pismo , i started using Epoxy making wind mill blades for GOUEGON BROTHERS or West system in my late teens and to tell you the truth i mostly go with a resin that is made by Shell which Skater uses but on the other hand i also go with a resin that is made by Plasco Corp here in Mich for the Areo Space & Marine Industry which offers a pot life from 20 to 165 minutes which is a little shorter... then the pot life of the Shell but non the less is just as good and cheaper then West System or there Pro set series which needs a cure time that is self induced . I have to say that my resin of choice for Epoxy resin is the Shell just because of the pot life which means work time but also takes 48 hours to cure .

Donziweasel
12-22-2010, 08:36 PM
I just got an order from Merton's, (5 - 1 gal. Vinylester jugs)......it's not the ashland brand, it's different brand bit cheaper........just wondering if that's what you used?

Yep, worked fine, but took a little practice. Never done much glass work before. I used the putty to build radius's and shape the transom. Also used it to seal in the transducer. Stuff is great!!! Very easy to work with.

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-22-2010, 08:38 PM
DW,

I just got an order from Merton's, (5 - 1 gal. Vinylester jugs)......it's not the ashland brand, it's different brand bit cheaper........just wondering if that's what you used?Scippy . just curious and please tell me it was not a G.P. resin ?

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-22-2010, 08:48 PM
D.W.i notice that you are from jackson hole and to tell you the truth i cant tell you how much fun over the years that i have had in that area and talk about the million dollar cowboy Bar ....with there saddle stools and all of the silver dollars inbedded in the bar .....WOW . Hey guy , over thirty years ago my wife and i spent are honeymoon in that area along with hiking in and around Beartooth pass and still come back every few years .

Phil S
12-22-2010, 09:02 PM
"it's not the ashland brand,"

I have to ask for personal reasons....does this refer to "Ashland", as in Ashland Oil ?

WKR,
Phil

gcarter
12-22-2010, 09:05 PM
"it's not the ashland brand,"

I have to ask for personal reasons....does this refer to "Ashland", as in Ashland Oil ?

WKR,
Phil

Yep!

Phil S
12-22-2010, 09:25 PM
Ashland Oil....based in my hometown of Ashland, KY ! A lot of family & friends work / worked there. That's pretty cool. Sorry for the hijack GC & others...kinda sentimental about that place on the map. :yes:

With kind regards,
Phil

Phil S
12-22-2010, 09:32 PM
"Hey guys /George , i would like everyone to know that i am not out to bash anyone here and if i come across a little too strong sometimes i apologize ."


I like this...a lot. :yes:

Phil S.

Dr. David Fleming
12-22-2010, 10:13 PM
Well it is like this - after ten or so years the majority of any particular hull model will be reduced to about 10% of the original production. Attribute this to accidents, sinking, fire, neglect and just distruction over time and salt water.

Many of the boats that make it to old age - will be neglected, abused, tore up, or modified by jackass mechanics - beat to death in every possible way.

As the price goes down the ease with which youth with no income and less judgement come to own them will increase - O impetious youth which always has excess of enthusiasm and limitation on knowledge will drive the remaining hulls to distruction in ways beyond what the original owners could even think of.

A few classic Donzi boats from every era will end up in the hands of collectors who will then patiently restore even the homeliest of hulls to original collector condition. Masters of marine fiberglass capable of attaching one half of a shot donzi to another half of another shot donzi just to come out with one complete boat.

Many great mahogany speedboats - Garwood, DeWhite, Chris Craft, Hacker - were routinely stripped of parts and run over by bulldozers then torched. Ask Pete Heinkel of Harsens Island Marina in MI - I can still see the smoke palls when he lit them off - "If I only knew what they would be worth I never would have!" I have seen collectors drag rotten beat up wooden wrecks off the bottom of lakes just to get something "original" worth fixing up. Then they are chasing old hardware, lights, cleats, steering wheels, engines and all the parts trying to put it the way the manufacturer built it. Sometimes even making new parts in foundry and machineshop.

We are not even talking about the knock off artists who will create fake donzi look alikes some day - or the future companies that will do "retro" donzi to give future folks a taste of what it was like in the day.

I am betting Donzi never made 400 boats total production per year - all models - only a few equiped with the best engines and finest art work - spread this across how many millions of American citizens - the boats you disrespect today will be the museum piece of tomorrow - be glad you can even find them - especially the beautiful ones.

Phil S
12-22-2010, 11:16 PM
....but agreed ! Let enough of them go un-restored / un-appreciated and the breed / legend dies. To me, old Donzi's are worth restoring...any model. The compliments you get at the dock make it worthwhile. (not that my boat gets any mind you,...but I've heard-tell of such..) :) The compliments I am familiar with are more like..."nice tow-boat"...."color-coordinated tow-rope...nice"....but I'll get there eventually. :wink:

Phil S.

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-23-2010, 09:29 AM
Doc , i hate to say this in case you do not know Pete Hinkel , died a few years ago .

Sweet little 16
12-23-2010, 12:17 PM
Well it is like this - after ten or so years the majority of any particular hull model will be reduced to about 10% of the original production. Attribute this to accidents, sinking, fire, neglect and just distruction over time and salt water.

Many of the boats that make it to old age - will be neglected, abused, tore up, or modified by jackass mechanics - beat to death in every possible way.

As the price goes down the ease with which youth with no income and less judgement come to own them will increase - O impetious youth which always has excess of enthusiasm and limitation on knowledge will drive the remaining hulls to distruction in ways beyond what the original owners could even think of.

A few classic Donzi boats from every era will end up in the hands of collectors who will then patiently restore even the homeliest of hulls to original collector condition. Masters of marine fiberglass capable of attaching one half of a shot donzi to another half of another shot donzi just to come out with one complete boat.

Many great mahogany speedboats - Garwood, DeWhite, Chris Craft, Hacker - were routinely stripped of parts and run over by bulldozers then torched. Ask Pete Heinkel of Harsens Island Marina in MI - I can still see the smoke palls when he lit them off - "If I only knew what they would be worth I never would have!" I have seen collectors drag rotten beat up wooden wrecks off the bottom of lakes just to get something "original" worth fixing up. Then they are chasing old hardware, lights, cleats, steering wheels, engines and all the parts trying to put it the way the manufacturer built it. Sometimes even making new parts in foundry and machineshop.

We are not even talking about the knock off artists who will create fake donzi look alikes some day - or the future companies that will do "retro" donzi to give future folks a taste of what it was like in the day.

I am betting Donzi never made 400 boats total production per year - all models - only a few equiped with the best engines and finest art work - spread this across how many millions of American citizens - the boats you disrespect today will be the museum piece of tomorrow - be glad you can even find them - especially the beautiful ones.


I'd say you'd be close to right with any other boat MFG'r but not Donzi

going on those numbers

there would only 2.5 limited editions left in each model 18 minx and 22
there would only be approx 100 skisporter left of the aprox 1000 they made .
there would be only 2 criterions left out of the 20 or so they made.
and 1.3 of the baby 14

the numbers on the old Donzi classics are higher than that

and i bet in the heyday of teleflex or early chisholm ownership they were north of 400 total hulls a year

I bet there are alot more then we realize, sitting under tarps in barns by original owners now in their golden years that lie in original great condition.

bertsboat
12-23-2010, 09:31 PM
Slight correction there. Its 1.4 of the Baby 14. There were 14 made. Mine is the number 14.
And I know, some were made at Cigarette but its still a Donzi.

Sweet little 16
12-23-2010, 09:37 PM
Slight correction there. Its 1.4 of the Baby 14. There were 14 made. Mine is the number 14.
And I know, some were made at Cigarette but its still a Donzi.


yours has a crt hin on it doesn't it????? that makes it a Cigarette, just like the 24 footer that sonic made off the spitfire hull those are sonics

bertsboat
12-23-2010, 09:57 PM
Well that means there are only about 10 Baby 14's out there. Scott has a 14 Cigarette too. His HIN is CRT13. Mine is CRT14. But it's going to wear the Donzi name because it from the same mold just built in another building by Don. It's really a Cigonzi

Donziweasel
12-24-2010, 07:56 AM
D.W.i notice that you are from jackson hole and to tell you the truth i cant tell you how much fun over the years that i have had in that area and talk about the million dollar cowboy Bar ....with there saddle stools and all of the silver dollars inbedded in the bar .....WOW . Hey guy , over thirty years ago my wife and i spent are honeymoon in that area along with hiking in and around Beartooth pass and still come back every few years .

Give me a hollar next time you are in town. I have been here 16 years and still love it!!! :)

Sorry about the hijack.


the numbers on the old Donzi classics are higher than that

I agree, the math is WAY off.


yours has a crt hin on it doesn't it?????

Bert, you have a cig despite saying Donzi on it. It is still cool.

joseph m. hahnl
12-24-2010, 10:01 AM
Well that means there are only about 10 Baby 14's out there. Scott has a 14 Cigarette too. His HIN is CRT13. Mine is CRT14. But it's going to wear the Donzi name because it from the same mold just built in another building by Don. It's really a Cigonzi



Stand tall be proud:party:. The name Cigarette on the side of a boat has a little more prestige than the name Donzi:yes:


Moisture dopesn't necessarily mean it's rotted.
many times the transom lower glass, along w/the rear inner glass can be partially removed and the wood allowed to dry.
The rot issue needs to be determined.
Then the repairs can include where the water is coming from and the proper repairs made.
Just depends, it may be fine.

This is the best statement made in this thread:yes:.

I have not seen or heard any indications that the survey revealed rot. "Dry rot" is caused by a wood fungus.If the fungus is not present then neither is dry rot.

http://www.livingwithbugs.com/Images/dry_rot.jpg


What is dry rot?
http://www.livingwithbugs.com/Images/spacer.gifDry rot (see photo ) is a weakening of wood caused by one of several species of fungus. The fungus digests the parts of the wood that give the wood strength and stiffness. Weakened wood is typically somewhat dry, hence the name dry rot, and brittle and may have a blocky appearance.
http://www.livingwithbugs.com/Images/spacer.gifIronically, dry rot usually results from too much moisture in contact with wood. The dry rot fungus has the unusual ability to transport water from wet areas to dry areas allowing the fungus to grow in relatively dry wood. If not stopped the dry rot fungus will so weaken wood that it may eventually disintegrate.

http://www.livingwithbugs.com/Images/spacer.gifIf moisture cannot be controlled, or if the dry rot fungus has gained a foot-hold, then wood should be treated to inhibit the growth of the fungus. Boric acid, or borate, is an excellent fungicide (a pesticide that kills fungi) against the dry rot fungus.

http://www.livingwithbugs.com/Images/spacer.gifBorates for structural pests like dry rot are generally applied as liquids with some type of sprayer. However, most forms of borate should not be used if liquid water is present, such as outdoors, because borates are water soluble and will wash away. In these wet situations use fused borate instead because it is made for exterior applications. One popular borate product that is specifically made to treat dry rot is Bora Care (see Using Bora Care To Protect Wood From Dry Rot (http://www.livingwithbugs.com/bora_care.html)).

Conquistador_del_mar
12-25-2010, 02:16 AM
What is dry rot?
http://www.livingwithbugs.com/Images/spacer.gifDry rot (see photo ) is a weakening of wood caused by one of several species of fungus. The fungus digests the parts of the wood that give the wood strength and stiffness. Weakened wood is typically somewhat dry, hence the name dry rot, and brittle and may have a blocky appearance.


I used to do fiberglass structural repairs professionally. I have sucked up entire transoms in a wet vac when the rot completely took over. The one boat that I really remember had small to large white, grey, and black mushrooms growing out of the transom and scared me a little with the thought of what types of mushrooms and fungi they were. I treated that boat with extra caution removing the transom - :yes:
Good thread here. Back when I was doing glass work, I was only using polyester resins, but I always beefed up the transoms, stringers, crossmembers, etc. with so much glass that I knew the boat would never have a problem again. I told one customer that 5 fat women could dance on his floor now - he quickly responded that he hoped to never put his boat to such a test - lol. Bill

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-25-2010, 02:01 PM
Hey guys, MERRY CHRISTMAS and to tell you the truth talk about a bunch of bickering hens ..................one says this & one says that and to tell you the truth considering i have been doing fiberglass repair for over forty years now and still hard at it no matter if the wood is just wet or rot has already set in the bottom line is.......... the problem needs to be addressed .

joseph m. hahnl
12-25-2010, 02:58 PM
Hey guys, MERRY CHRISTMAS and to tell you the truth talk about a bunch of bickering hens ..................one says this & one says that and to tell you the truth considering i have been doing fiberglass repair for over forty years now and still hard at it no matter if the wood is just wet or rot has already set in the bottom line is.......... the problem needs to be addressed .

Merry Christmas:party:

The Bottom line. Is it a deal breaker?

OFFSHORE GINGER
12-25-2010, 05:43 PM
Merry Christmas:party:

The Bottom line. Is it a deal breaker?At this point who cares ....because the man is going to do what he feels is right for him and once again MERRY CHRISTMAS and till next weekend happy NEW YEAR .