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fogducker III
09-24-2010, 12:58 PM
This is a VERY different idea........:eek:

http://www.rexresearch.com/singh/singh.htm

Dr. David Fleming
09-24-2010, 02:10 PM
Interesting article - the Indian engineer appears to be what in the USA is called "practical engineer" the trouble with this type of skilled person is they lack the college engineering degree which puts them in communication with the rest of the world.

Combustion chamber design and study has been going on for the last 100 years and really started with Sir Harry Ricardo who worked with WWI aircraft engine design and laid out the basics of design used today and which this article is about. Ricardo was the one who developed the "Squish" chamber shown in the sited text. This is shaped part of the combustion chamber which creates turbulance - this is old school.

The Big Block Chevy for example is an attempt to use the wedge shaped chamber with its natural "squish" and "quench" design and to incorporate it with the natural breathing advantages of the "hemi" design. The engine valves are splayed in "hemi" fashion on a wedge chamber. Nice work done by GM in the 1960's. The popular Chrysler Hemi which is focus of the current work by that manufacturer was an old school design from the 1930's or earlier that Chrysler worked in the 1950's and then 60's and revived as a retro ad campaign under Dr. Z in the 2000 era.

All of these design ideas are being micro managed today to find hidden and overlooked power concepts. It would appear that Mr. Singha (SP) of this article has developed grooves or bumps or channels to enhance the turbulance created in the combustion chamber. Other performance tuners like DART or Eldebrock are also playing with slight reshaping of the chamber - angle movement of the spark plugs - variation of combustion chamber surface finish.

Professional engineers study this stuff develop the concepts scientifically, test the results and write papers for the SAE - Society of Automotive Engineers - which becomes free knowledge to the engineering community. Hot Rodders develop this stuff use it for racing then it gets spotted by the engineers and used in general manufacturing as part of the common knowledge.

This kind of story on the internet will have everyone figuring it out pretty quick. Basically, you can't keep secrets for long - manufacturers just don't want to do poor engineering and then get involved in law suits with cars that run into walls - hence their elaborate procedures before manufacturing. Eventually eveyone gets the changes and does them.

Dr. David Fleming
09-24-2010, 02:24 PM
Interesting article - the Indian engineer appears to be what in the USA is called "practical engineer" the trouble with this type of skilled person is they lack the college engineering degree which puts them in communication with the rest of the world.

Combustion chamber design and study has been going on for the last 100 years and really started with Sir Harry Ricardo who worked with WWI aircraft engine design and laid out the basics of design used today and which this article is about. Ricardo was the one who developed the "Squish" chamber shown in the sited text. This is shaped part of the combustion chamber which creates turbulance - this is old school.

The Big Block Chevy for example is an attempt to use the wedge shaped chamber with its natural "squish" and "quench" design and to incorporate it with the natural breathing advantages of the "hemi" design. The engine valves are splayed in "hemi" fashion on a wedge chamber. Nice work done by GM in the 1960's. The popular Chrysler Hemi which is focus of the current work by that manufacturer was an old school design from the 1930's or earlier that Chrysler worked in the 1950's and then 60's and revived as a retro ad campaign under Dr. Z in the 2000 era.

All of these design ideas are beign micro managed today to find hidden and overlooked power concepts. It would appear that Mr. Singha (SP) of this article has developed grooves or bumps or channels to enhance the turbulance created in the combustion chamber. Other performance tuners like DART or Eldebrock are also playing with slight reshaping of the chamber - angle movement of the spark plugs - variation of combustion chamber surface finish.

Professional engineers study this stuff develop the concepts scientifically, test the results and write papers for the SAE - Society of Automotive Engineers - which becomes free knowledge to the engineering community. Hot Rodders develop this stuff use it for racing then it gets spotted by the engineers and used in general manufacturing as part of the common knowledge.

This kind of story on the internet will have everyone figuring it out pretty quick. Basically, you can't keep secrets for long - manufacturers just don't want to do poor engineering and then get involved in law suits with cars that run into walls - hence their elaborate procedures before manufacturing. Eventually eveyone gets the changes and does them.

BUIZILLA
09-24-2010, 04:09 PM
I've never seen anyone that wrote papers for the SAE in the Winners Circle due to what they wrote...

mphatc
09-24-2010, 08:41 PM
similar to Metric Mechanic's Surface turbulance theory . . .

http://www.metricmechanic.com/catalog/surface-turbulance.php

I have my own thoughts backed by a Dr. Bharton Patel who started Fluent, a world leading heat transfer and CFD software company . . .
This software is used by Ferrari F1 and the worlds leading engine manufacturers . . .

basicly . . there's easier and better technology, and this "may" only work till the carbon builds up, and it will!

Mario L.

MOP
09-27-2010, 04:08 PM
I am a true believer in non polished surfaces, I had this proved to me many years back. I spent weeks porting and polishing a set of camel backs, I took them to Jack Merkel Sr. shop here on Long Island. He took one look and laughed, he had me scuff up one set of ports then flowed several to show how much less a shiny port flowed. That was lesson #1!!! As a few of you know I was an avid sail boat racer, while watching the Americas Cup that was held in Australia I saw the results of Conner putting the Boeing Rivlets on the bottom of the US entry. That spring instead of sanding the bottom of my boat baby azz smooth I rolled the bottom paint on leaving a nice stipple finish, I was noticeably faster from then on. If any of you venture out to Block Island you will find my name on the Block Island race trophy winning my division and boat over all, I was very honored to win such a prestigious event. A few grumped about me having Johnathan Chandler the winner of several international Maxi boat races at the helm much of the race, I told them to F off who else but me would know what the 16 lines in my cockpit did without a blink! Anyway point is smooth is not FAST, the last 1/3 of my 22 has been sanded with #200. Mr. Mad Poddle had commented on the same facts, it is important to disturb the stiction layer to increase flow.