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View Full Version : Kill Switch-where to install?



Donzi Vol
07-13-2010, 11:55 PM
I have an aftermarket kill switch on order from West Marine, and I'm trying to get it straight in my head on how and where to install it. I would really like for it to be as out of sight as possible since the dash and shifter are currently original to 1970. Any thoughts, suggestions, or past experiences?

Thanks in advance,
David

Planetwarmer
07-14-2010, 03:30 AM
You could mount it next to the seat down low and put the lanyard around your ankle. That is where I wear my lanyard.

MOP
07-14-2010, 07:42 AM
Ditto on the ankle! Though mine will easily reach my wrist I found it can get pulled off when reaching for something, or get caught on the seat adjuster or shifter my adjusters are outboard and not shin bangers.

mattyboy
07-14-2010, 08:41 AM
This was advice given to me by an old timer on my lake who raced and always had the fastest boat around and had his laynard save his ass on a few occassions.

you want to sit down at the helm like you are in control hands on the controls , you want the laynard to operate if you get into any position other than that!!!!! I usually clip the laynard to my vest. he had an ankle laynard said it did no good when he stuffed his boat broke his ribs on the wheel and basically fell out of the seat onto the floor with the wind knocked out of him. his ankles didn't really move but he was not in control of the boat

you want it in a place that the leash won't get in your way , but it is a safety device you want it to work not look good or not been seen .


We ( the judges)have discussed this in length at the Lake George Donzi Classic Club boat show at our dustoff. Any modern safety equipment ie kill switches, nuetral safety switches, fire suppression systems are all welcomed additions to any classic and will have no adverse affect on originality or any other scoring category

on the 16 and Kenny's 20 cig we put in on the port side of the dash in a spot between the shifter and the wheel as to not affect with either throttle control or the wheel and it goes directly to the vest so if you stand up or fall out of the seat the laynard is pulled. a kill switch was the first thing I purchased for the hornet

BUIZILLA
07-14-2010, 09:45 AM
the first appendage that would leave the boat is where the tether should be attached..

glashole
07-14-2010, 10:09 AM
We ( the judges)have discussed this in length at the Lake George Donzi Classic Club boat show at our dustoff. Any modern safety equipment ie kill switches, nuetral safety switches, fire suppression systems are all welcomed additions to any classic and will have no adverse affect on originality or any other scoring category


the senator has spoken

The Hedgehog
07-14-2010, 09:06 PM
I put mine on the dash. I usually wear it on the ankle when loafing around and wrist when hammering it.

The most important thing is to wear it.

fogducker III
07-14-2010, 09:31 PM
the first appendage that would leave the boat is where the tether should be attached..

In my case then, that would be around my neck.......:wink:

Donzi Vol
07-14-2010, 10:47 PM
Thanks guys...all very helpful advice. And I've accepted that it is a necessary addition. I should have done it before anything else.

Matty, thanks for the reassurance on the originality deal. Most of my desire of wanting to keep it original is just for my own kicks. But safety first.

It looks like I may have an open spot on the dash because I had to replace a switch (the drive tilt switch) next to the steering wheel. I may be able to fabricate the area to make it look pretty clean.

I'll post some pics next week once I get the part and start the process.

JimG
07-15-2010, 07:27 AM
Donzi Vol, on my 1970 I mounted it just under the dash on the left side of the wheel. Can't see it, except for the lanyard. I clip it to the leg of my shorts. Works like a charm, and stays out of the way. I refuse to drill any more visible holes in my boat...:yes:

Jim

RickSE
07-15-2010, 10:29 AM
It's always nice to see guys on this board talking about installing and using kill switches. None of us want to end up like this guy with a brand new boat up on the rocks. Long story short, he turned to dodge a jet ski, hooked the boat, ejected himself and all passengers, rest is history. Most of the guys on the Performance Boats website, where this pic came from, say they have never used a kill switch and still don't understand why they would need too, even after seeing this. :frown:

mattyboy
07-15-2010, 10:38 AM
Rick,

my biggest fear would be having my 300 + HP classic with my favorite SS prop doing a death circle around me.

I know where Jim is coming from too, so on the hornet I am going to remove the cigarette lighter on the driver's side and use that hole for the switch

The Hedgehog
07-15-2010, 11:12 AM
If you want to talk safety....in some cases the death circle can be avoided all together by installing the appropriate steering for a 300+ hp boat. Best to have a cure instead of treating the symptom.

If you don't have external steering, you should closely inspect your internal steering system on a regular basis.

Cuda
07-15-2010, 12:02 PM
Rick,

my biggest fear would be having my 300 + HP classic with my favorite SS prop doing a death circle around me.

I know where Jim is coming from too, so on the hornet I am going to remove the cigarette lighter on the driver's side and use that hole for the switch
One I bought for my 20 foot Formula fit exactly in the lighter hole.

Cuda
07-15-2010, 12:18 PM
All my boats had a kill switch and I wore it anytime I was on a plane.

The 82 Donzi I had had the kill switch factory mounted on the side next to your feet.

I had a friend of mine get killed a few years ago. He was in a busy lake (Lake Tarpon) in a Basstracker boat. He was standing behind the wheel and dropped his cellphone. Zeke was a BIG guy. When he bent to get the phone, his belly hit the wheel ejecting him and his passanger from the boat. The boat was running about 30. All the boats nearby were trying to catch the runaway boat. The passanger said he saw Zeke treading water for a while, and then just slipped under the water and drowned. The boat made a circle, and ran over the passager. He lost an arm. All could have been prevented by a kill switch. Zeke was my friend and is still missed.

Donzi Vol
07-15-2010, 10:55 PM
Donzi Vol, on my 1970 I mounted it just under the dash on the left side of the wheel. Can't see it, except for the lanyard. I clip it to the leg of my shorts. Works like a charm, and stays out of the way. I refuse to drill any more visible holes in my boat...:yes:

Jim

Thanks Jim. It always slips my mind that we have the same set-up (which is priceless, IMO :)). One question, though. If you didn't drill any holes, how did you mount it behind the dash? As in, what is it supported by?

Donzi Vol
07-15-2010, 10:56 PM
Picked up the part today...hoping to install tomorrow or Saturday. Hooray for safety!

JimG
07-15-2010, 11:23 PM
My switch is a surface mount. I screwed it to the backside of the dash using number 8 screws.

Kirbyvv
07-16-2010, 09:17 AM
I put mine by my left knee, just inside the cowling (left hand drive). It is out of the way, not very visible and works on my ankle, wrist or clipped to my life vest. I usually put it on my ankle.

Donzi Vol
07-17-2010, 04:44 PM
I got the switch installed today. I mounted it behind the dash (Thanks, Jim!). Hooked it up correctly the second time, and now it does what it's supposed to do.

Thanks for all of the input!

Cuda
07-17-2010, 09:11 PM
I always wore my lanyard on my ankle. In the Formula, it had the Merc racing kill switched. I put them together mechanically so I wouldn't have to wear two lanyards.

If I tried my wrist or my life vest, it would interfere with my steering.