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CDMA
01-20-2001, 02:58 PM
I have been very busy so I have not been able to post much. I am midway through a transom rebuild on the 18. Coming out really nice. Going to a RH alpha with a raised x dimension as mentioned before. I am going to go the full 2.5 inches so we will see how it works. Other than that I am trying to fit in an engine build for the 18. Really want to get that done. Also seems that I will have a Rolls trailer soon for the 18. So withing 4 months that boat should be in my mind done. 383/ alpha with Rolls. I am really excited.

The 22 is going to be started in the summer and still searching for the Arneson drive. I have not done much on that boat but bought a new/used 22 galvanized trailer. I figure the 383 for the 18 will give me some of the experience I need to build the BB for the 22.

I currently am off from school till march so I am getting a lot done on the boat. Part of my school program is required marine related interships over the winter. Right now I am working at Derecktor Shipyards in Mamaroneck. Really a great experience. I am in the process of helping one of the mechanics with a rebuild of a 50 foot tug that sank. It includes a complete rebuild of an 8 cyl MAN Diesel. Other projects going on there are a major refit of a 125 foor megayacht,new construction of a 115 foot trawler style megayacht, rebuilding of an 80 foot wooden boat, waranty work on the fast ferry Buquebus, and repowering of the fast ferry Fying cloud. So far it has been a great experience not to mention a few extra dollars. Only real problem is it is so damn cold but oh well.

Well I may not be posting as much but I still try to keep up to date on the weekends.

Later guys,

Chris

RickR
02-04-2001, 03:20 PM
CDMA
How are the 18 and Captain Nemo's Tug comming along?


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RICKR
mailto:riggerb@aol.comriggerb@aol.com</A>

CDMA
02-04-2001, 11:03 PM
The 18 is cranking along. I am done with the fiberglass work and getting ready to reshoot the transom. The glaswoork came out great. 7 layers on the transom then 2 3/4 inch ply followed by another 6 layers. All 15 oz Biaxil in West system. The stringers were doubled up with 3/4 ply and 5 or so layers of glass. New accessory shelves in the rear of the engine compartment as well as new tabbing on the gas tank stringers. We did all the glass work in one day then heated the garage to about 85 degrees over night and vacuum bagged the whole engine area. Really was amazing. There are no voids at all in the glasswork and the inside looks almost molded. Way too much extra work but I would do it again. Now I have to start getting the Alpha stuff together.

Captain Nemo's tug is no longer my project. I got about 70% done and the y pulled me off for another ptoject that actually made them $$$. So it sort of sits unfinished witht he engine hanging in the mechanics shop. Last week I spent way too much time in an office trying to figure out how much aluminum a 240 foot fast ferry needs. But this week I am off to the carpenters shop to hopefully learn a little wood working. I do have tommorow off fgor my Grandfather's passing but will be back there Tuesday. So far it has been a great experience.

Well that is about it. I will keep you informed.

Chris

GeneD
02-05-2001, 08:50 AM
What is with the vacuum bagging thing?

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GeneD
007
Melbourne, Florida

GEOO
02-05-2001, 09:00 AM
How does the plastic adhere to the hull to create a vacuum? It can't be a bag! GEOO

Len
02-05-2001, 10:14 AM
GeneD,...bagging, about he nicest way to lay-up a hull or deck, uniform thickness throughout glasswork, smooth finish to work off and ability to do multiple layers of high tech fabrics encapsulated in epoxy/resins in one pass. More time consuming, (new tools and methods required by the builder, bladders required etc) but a far superior job. A vacuumn pump to generate one atmosphere (14.7 psi) is required and this is the force that is exerted against the mould sides. Uniform thickness is the result and perfect fluid/material ratios. The excess fluid is soaked up as it flows over the top of the surface. You need to be sure to have enough capacity here to take all of the excess prior to running into the sealing area. A sealing ring (B-sealing tape)is placed around the perimeter of the project, (further away from the sides than the soak up pads) for the film to adhere to and be the reference and entrance for the vacuumn hose. This is where the "bag" gets sucked down to. Picture a bag sealer that you would use to package a bunch of food for the freezer. Same principle, only there is no "resin" to be drawn out once the air is removed. The sealing area is the front portion of the machine that you hold down. I have an aquaintance that owns a fiberglass supply store and boat builds on the side. He built a hi-tech kayak for the boat show a few years back, kevlar and carbon fibre make-up, it weighed nothing, he would throw it like an arrow for attendees at the event but you COULDN'T put a bullet through the side of it.
http://www.donzi.net/ubb/eek.gif Amazing stuff.



[This message has been edited by Len (edited 02-05-2001).]

CDMA
02-05-2001, 04:30 PM
Thanks len saved me some time. That about sums it up.

Chris

GeneD
02-06-2001, 09:48 AM
I'm still in a fog.
Apparently, this is nothing a guy like me with limited means can do at the backyard shop.

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GeneD
007
Melbourne, Florida

Len
02-06-2001, 07:38 PM
GeneD,...this job is not a problem for the "backyard shop". All that is needed is a general understanding of the principles of the procedure and a game plan for what you are trying to accomplish. You will need release film, bag, bladder, pump, and other minor materials. I have done it, it's no big deal. (once you have done it once you will see how easy it is and ways to better it next time as well as better ways to approach the end result. You can be in control of set times with the catalyst. Many fabrics, such as bi-axial, tri-axial, roven woven, cloth, honeycombs, kevlar, and graphite knits can be used and all that is needed is to saturate with a resin/epoxy for the binder. I would be inclined to try polyester resins the first time out and a long cure to tack. You will enjoy the one less stress of not having to worry about things "going off" prior to your approval of the job you have laid down.
http://www.donzi.net/ubb/smile.gif Anyone who has done the things to (boats)Donzi's that I read about here, stringer replacement, raising X-dimensions, transom rebuilds, deck and hull faring, hull bluprinting, adding and removing hook and rocker, exhaust hole filling, new drive locations, etc. could easily accomplish this procedure. Let me know if you have any questions. I would love to help if I can...(from 3500 miles away) Here's a couple of lame "How To's" sites to give you a better idea and applications.
http://search.dogpile.com/texis/search?q=vacuum+bagging&geo=no&fs=web
http://www.multi.fi/~dahlin/details.htm
http://www.rocstock.org/fiber101.vac1.html



[This message has been edited by Len (edited 02-06-2001).]

roadtrip
02-07-2001, 02:09 PM
CDMA,
There is an Arenson advertised in the back of the February issue of Hotboat. Might be worth a look see. roadtrip

CDMA
02-07-2001, 02:31 PM
SOLD.