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raritan
03-22-2000, 12:25 PM
This is a very nice page. Heres my question...I have available a 66 16ft with a locked up engine. It is the Holman Moody which I assume is the original engine. Were they 289 or 302 cuin. What did H.M. do as far as modifying the Ford Block. I can buy the boat for about 3000. Is it worth it? Should I rebuild the engine or replace the block?? I appreciate your help.

harbormaster
03-22-2000, 07:23 PM
I'll sell you one for 1900.00

Rich
03-22-2000, 08:38 PM
If your 16 footer is really a 1966 then the original engine was probably an Eaton Interceptor which was either a 260 or 289 Ford. If the engine is locked up, you would have to open it up to find out why and then decide on new or rebuild. Lee Holman told me that Holman & Moody were using standard Ford industrial engines with brass freeze out plugs. Nothing special about the engine.

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Rich

Emmo
03-23-2000, 12:04 AM
I bought a 5.0 HO engine from a Ford Motorsports dealer to replace the HM 302 in the Mello Yello. HM wanted about $5K plus a couple of months to rebuild the original. The Ford Motorsports motor was only $2,300. It has more torque and better top-end performance than the HM motor and has beefier components. There are some differences in the engines and there a few things you should know. If you are interested, I will post a "how to". Ask Forrest if you want an unbiased opinion about mine, he has owned and driven many Donzis including the first 16 that came from Donzi with a Mercruiser drive and has had it since new.

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Emmo mailto:emmette@emmette.comemmette@emmette.com</A>

Emmo
03-23-2000, 11:11 AM
Per Tom's request, here is some "how to" on swapping an old Windsor series motor for a new one:

The older 289's and 302's were balanced differently than the new ones, so the biggest change will be the flywheel. I did not have a local source for a flywheel but Ford Motorsports tech support recommended Total Performance in Michigan (810) HOT-FORD and they had me send my old flywheel and found one the would work on the new engine. I had to pay about $250 for the new one and I am sure that if I had known what I was looking for, I could have gotten one from a junkyard for much less http://206.150.187.82/ubb/confused.gif. Any additional advice on this from the board would be nice.

I chose to use the original intake and carburator because I could not find a marinized version of the Ford EFI or parts to make it so and an engineer at Inmar told there was no such animal, that PCM used Holley injection. I now know from talking to several Correct Craft nuts that the PCM GT40 351 uses a Ford EFI. The problem with just using theirs is that their engines are counter-rotating. PCM uses a version that does not have an oxygen sensor. I bet using some of their parts to marinize an automotive version (I have one for sale BTW), you could do it and I have seen some boats on this board that use non-marinized version, although I would hesitate to use non-marinized fuel system components as there is a great risk of fire or explosion.

Putting the new and old engines side by side, you can move the old hardware to the new engine and you will notice on the new engine that the oil pan, the oil pickup and the dipstick are rear-sump and the old one is a front-sump. Move all of the old oil stuff to the new engine and plug all of the holes in the head that the new will have when the automotive brackets, EGR, are removed, etc.

I took all of the old hardware and put it in a parts washer and/or ground all the paint off with a burnish wheel. In order to preserve the original look, I used the "Old Ford Blue" VHT engine paint on all of the accessories. You will also need paint the new engine as Ford does not use engine paint anymore. The problem with using VHT engine paint on the accessories is that they don't get hot enough for them to cure, so some of my hard work was in vain http://206.150.187.82/ubb/redface.gif. Any advice from the board would help here on finding a paint that matches the engine paint but does not have to get real hot to cure.

My biggest worry after I got into it and had solved the flywheel problem was the mechanical fuel pump. Not to worry, the new motor has the hickey to operate a mechanical fuel pump. My boat has a really good mechanical pump that will suck the chrome off a trailer hitch, so I did not want to have to go with electric. If I were going EFI, then I would have to go electric with a return anyway. Make sure to use all of the marine stuff for the ignition, starter and alternator. Also use the original valve covers and PCV or you will get positive oil pressure in the crankcase, which will blow the dipstick out of the hole.

The new motor has a great hydraulic roller camshaft that is perfectly suited for marine use. It has much beefier rods and crank. It comes with a double-row steel timing chain and gears and a huge oil pump.

Forrest's comment after driving it was that it was the strongest 302 he had ever seen and he has seen a few. The gas consumption is much lower than what I expected, which is good, since my stock fuel tank is only 18 gallons. At 2000 RPM (about 29 mph) it uses less than 4 gph and it has never used more than 8 gph even when skiing fat people that fall alot.

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Emmo mailto:emmette@emmette.comemmette@emmette.com</A>

[This message has been edited by Emmo (edited 03-23-2000).]

[This message has been edited by Emmo (edited 03-23-2000).]